X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What soil mix will you be up-potting your baby cuttings to and why?

    Hi everybody

    I know this is a topic that may have been beat to death already between this forum and F4F, but I'm really trying to carefully weigh my options out and hope to benefit from everyones experience. I know from reading lots of posts that figs will grow in just about anything, but if we can give our baby fig trees even the slightest advantage, I'm sure many of us would be willing to go the extra mile.. Or 100 miles if necessary lol just to give them a great start.. (Dang it I must taste a fresh fig this season!) So I'm thinking of going the traditional 5-1-1 route, except maybe substituting and/or mixing coir with peat because I have a lot on hand.. If I use coir instead, I would add Gypsum instead of lime and a pinch of epsom salts to account for coir's potential to deplete nitrogen.. I will have to start my search for pine bark fines soon though because I've had a difficult time locating them in the eastern PA area.. I'm also trying to decide if I should jump up to 3 gallon containers (or bigger) for the cuttings that have successfully rooted or if I should stick with 2 gal or below.. Okay.. So that's where I'm at so far.. How about you guys? Any super awesome mixes that I may have missed out on? Or perfectly simple & reasonably priced options that I may have overlooked? Definitely looking forward to hearing what everyone's plans are for the upcoming year.. Last count I'm at 54 rooted cuttings, and many more still in the making.. I see LOTS of sifting and soil mixing in my near future! Hehe πŸ˜±πŸ˜‰
    My Plant Inventory: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...HZcBjcsxMwQ7iY

    Rooted Cuttings Available 2021:
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...fxsT1DuH8/edit

  • #2
    Hi Jamie,

    Here's the mix i use. It's slightly modified from Kerry's (@drivewayfarmer) mix.

    Three - 5 gallon buckets of ProMix HP
    Two cups Pro-Gro 5-3-4
    One cup dolomitic lime
    Two cups greensand
    One cup Azomite
    Three quarts Worm castings
    Three quarts Coast of Maine Lobster Compost
    Eight quarts extra coarse perlite ( i only add enough until the mix "feels" right, maybe 3-4 quarts)

    With respect to up-potting, folks usually follow the quart->1 gal, 1 gal->3/5 gal, 5 gal->15 gal.

    Good Luck!
    Last edited by fitzski; 01-21-2016, 07:50 AM.
    Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks again Kevin! I will check it out

    • fitzski
      fitzski commented
      Editing a comment
      one other thing, i only add enough extra perlite until it "feels" right

      I think last year I added 3-4 quarts instead of 8 in the recipe.

    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Lol Kevin you just reminded me of my Italian grandma when I've asked about her recipes.. I say "gram how much of this do I add??" Her reply, "I dont know Jamie, I do it by feel! Just watch & stop with the questions!" Lol

  • #3
    This is great info--thanks Kevin! Thanks for asking the question, J! How's baby Marseilles doing?
    Zone 7a in Virginia

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Hey Sarina! Baby Marseilles is a (not so)little growing machine! Can't get over how big that one is, it has outgrown it's half gallon that I up-potted too and I will soon need to up-pot again!

  • #4
    For the first foray in to soil I use Pro-Mix HP Bio/Myco with just a sprinkle of worm castings on top into a 1 gal pot. I pre-moisten the soil so that it just barely sticks together if I squeeze it. I put 1-2" in the bottom of a 1 gal container, put the fig in and sprinkle the soil in over it, maintaining as much air in there as possible. This is the stage where a lot of mortality happens. Sometimes I'll mix a few small pine bark chunks in as a reservoir of moisture if they're getting potted up in the summer. Once they're doing well in gallons when I up pot I go to 7 gal, where they wait until they prove themselves, then some go to anywhere from 15 - 30 gal pots. For '7 and up' I use a base of large pine bark chunks and add compost, pro-mix, worm castings and Tomato Tone, all in decreasing amounts. My worm castings have azomite mixed in. I sprinkle some crushed limestone on top of the soil.

    I would never use grani-grit unless my pots were constantly blowing over. Mine never do so I don't I keep my pots close together in early Spring and then spread them out a bit as they grow. Soon after they're rooted in the ground and it's not an issue I don't want to double the weight of pots I have to move around.

    I find that once figs outgrow a 1 gal pot you don't have to baby them anymore so I don't use things that just take up space without either holding water or nutrients. Pine bark does a great job of holding water without letting it displace air.
    Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Wow lots of great info here Bob! Great tips and I am impressed with all the care you take with your baby figs.. I'm seeing a trend with pro-mix, azomite, & worm castings.. I've got the two latter, but may need to look into finding some pro-mix now as well. So no gran-it-grit, too heavy with already heavy big pots right? It may be something for me to try though since I live in a constant wind tunnel during winter & spring at least.. Last spring My pots were always getting blown over, so maybe this might help when they are in smaller pots at least.. Thank you again for sharing your experience, great stuff!

  • #5
    As far as pot size, the sky is the limit. I've generally been going from a rooted cutting to a 1 gal pot to 7-10 gal pot in 1 season. They will fill a 7-10 gallon pot the first season, no problem. Of course, with 50 some cuttings that's a lot of potting mix!

    Pretty much any mix will work for backyard growing, just mix up what's handy. Larger pots should be better draining, that's about all I'm super concerned about anymore! Beyond that it's some potting mix and pine fines or pine bark mulch.
    Last edited by Kelby; 01-20-2016, 01:44 PM.
    https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
    SE PA
    Zone 6

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      I was thinking that I may kinda play it by ear with pot size too.. It seems some of my cuttings have exploded more than others and the Sal's Gene I just up-potted barely fit into the 1 gallon, so I went with a 2 gallon on that one & so far so good (fingers crossed!) I totally agree though, with 50+ cuttings, it doesn't seem an option for me to go straight to large pots on all! Will definitely have to decide case by case, or perhaps paycheck by paycheck?? Lol! Thank you for sharing Kelby!

    • Kelby
      Kelby commented
      Editing a comment
      Also, I know some people get pine fines at Home Depot. If you are unsuccessful in your area I know some places down in my area that have it. A company out of Lancaster, Twin Oaks, wholesales it. Fairly common to find their products at garden centers, if you ask maybe they can order it in.

    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      That's great to know Kelby! I have family in that area too so I would definitely be willing to make the drive to get it all at once in bulk & then head over to make a day of it with my cousin in Lititiz! My home depot & lowes never seems to have anything except colored hardwood mulch.. I'd much rather not have to go to a big box store whenever possible anyway, so thank you for letting me know

  • #6
    Pro-mix HP because I made the mistake of buying Miracle gro potting mix that was infested with gnat larvae that I fought for a month and they won I had to throw away 25plus cuttings I'm sure you could get gnats in any potting soil you buy but that was the worst ever
    Wish List -

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Boy ohhhh boy do I hear ya on that one Dave! Same thing happened to me end last summer just as I was up-potting some summer cuttings.. Let's just say the battle with fungus gnats continues from that little oopsie I made! Lol now I make sure that my potting mix or anything going into the mix, is not laying soaking wet outside at some store when I go to purchase! Good luck to us all on not buying a bag infested with those horrible creatures!

    • Dave
      Dave commented
      Editing a comment
      This is why I don't buy any ripped bags anymore those little buggers get in there and they spread like wild fire

  • #7
    I've used the 5-1-1 mix also, and this year I'm planning on using it exclusively. It seems almost impossible to over water.

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      That is a big plus for a self-confessed chronic over-waterer lol! I cannot even tell you the level of restraint I must use NOT to overwater my cuttings!

  • #8
    40% Jungle growth 40% coir 20% chunky perlite. To that some fertilizer and lime.
    Cutting sales have ended for the season. Plant sales will start March 1 at 8 eastern time. If it is still too cold in your area I can hold your plants till a date of your choosing.

    Comment


    • DBJohnson
      DBJohnson commented
      Editing a comment
      Just did some searching to see if I could find it in my area. Looks like Jungle Growth went out of business early last year.

    • Hershell
      Hershell commented
      Editing a comment
      Oh no! The Wills fault

    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Dang it Wills! Lol

  • #9
    ProMix HP, chunky perlite (#4), worm castings. One gal pots go to 7 gal and 7 gal go to 15 or 20.
    newnandawg 7b Newnan, GA

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Promix definitely seems to be quite popular here, along with the worm castings.. Maybe I could talk one of my boys into wanting a worm farm lol! It also seems that once we get passed the one gallon initial jumping point that we are good to put those babies in a pretty large container without too many worries.. Thanks for sharing

    • COGardener
      COGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      Vermicultur is just part of composting.

  • #10
    I use a 5-2-1-1 mix.
    5 parts sifted bark(1/4"-1/2")
    2 parts peat
    1 part perlite (sifted to remove fines)
    1 part Surface MVP (sifted to remove fines)

    I like it cause it drains well, roots seem to love it, and it's re-usable.

    To fix up used mix I sift it and remove everything that falls through a window screen. Then I add back in new peat. The sifted out stuff is perfect for adding to raised beds.
    Fig & Blackberry Farmer in Sunol, CA.

    Comment


    • drew51
      drew51 commented
      Editing a comment
      I myself do not like turface for various reasons I feel Diatomaceous earth is a much better product. Pores are larger so roots can access water better, holds more water than turface, supplies silicon a trace element needed by plants, and is much easier to find. I also do not care for perlite which breaks down in about 5 years. I like to recycle to raised beds, and besides looking terrible will turn to mush in 5 years. I use Napa floor dry which can be obtained at any Napa store, make sure it's DE though and not clay. Or Optisorb sold at O'Reilly's auto parts. So I use pine bark, peat, compost, and DE. I may add other amendments if on hand azomite, lime, green sand, worm castings, etc. Adding compost was a major breakthrough stopping any root rot, and adding trace elements, bacteria, and nutrients. I like the peat based composts for containers, or any of the specialty composts, some mentioned already. Fafard makes an excellent compost too.
      Last edited by drew51; 01-21-2016, 12:03 PM.

    • smatthew
      smatthew commented
      Editing a comment
      Jamie - Turface is extensively used on baseball fields. If there are ballfields in your area, somebody stocks Turface. Try John Deer Landscapes - they have a few locations in PA.

    • Harborseal
      Harborseal commented
      Editing a comment
      Diatomaceous Earth is a fine powder. It will clump when wet and hold that water near the roots and they will die. I'm sure you mean Calcined diatomaceous earth, like Napa Floor Dry. These are granules that adsorb water while allowing air spaces to be present. I tried these and never felt as if they added anything. Cuttings seemed to do worse with them. There is some evidence they contain hydrocarbon residues that may be harmful. Also, the dust from Calcined diatomaceous earth is fairly hazardous. Look up silicosis for more info. It's best to wear a mask and wet the material before using.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatomaceous_earth

  • #11
    I made a change this year and couldn't be happier with the results. My base mix for my gallon pots is Foxfarm Ocean Forest with additional perlite and pine bark fines mixed in. After the new cutting has acclimated to the up potting, I'll begin weekly feedings with diluted Foxfarm Big Bloom an organic liquid fertilizer. Once I see the new plant has become established I begin to supplement the feedings with my secret weapon...Humboldts Secret Golden Tree. I use this on all my figs. This stuff is amazing!
    Rick - Port Isabel, Texas / zone - 10a

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Ooohhh, I love secret weapons thanks for sharing! Lol! Is there a special blend of ingrediants or something new or unusual in it? I'm assuming you must have had great results with it? Also, funny you mentioned fox farm as I literally just bought a huge bag of it from my local hydroponics store.. I just wanted to give it a try because I always hear great things about their products.. It wasn't the Ocean Forest though, it was a brown bag next to it.. thanks for sharing!

  • #12
    I up-pot to 1 gal and mix up 2/3 fertilome upm and 1/3 perlite, pre wet with some superthrive and fertilizer.
    Rafael
    Zone 10b, Miami, FL

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Rafael thank you for sharing your recipe! I've seen "fertilome" mentioned many times between both forums but have never seen it in stores. What is your source if you dont mind me asking?

  • #13
    I plan on using the 5-1-1 mix that i mixed up about 2 months ago. I also just picked up Calcined Clay (tractor supply) per the 5-1-1-1 variant that Pete has discussed during a recent work trip to boston. So i will probably do a combination of the two or going fully to 5-1-1-1 per Pete's recommendation. I have a handful of small trees i was either gifted or purchased last year that i need to bareroot into new medium since they are rootbound.
    May the Figs be with you!
    ​​​​​

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Matty I too follow AscPete's recommendations very closely and hope to find the right type of calcined clay product to give it a try myself. I kept buying the wrong kind last season ugh (even bought kitty litter)! Lol oh well, Im ready for oil spills of any kind should they occur!

  • #14
    40% compost, 40% peat, 20% perlite. 1 cup each of plant tone, lime, and green sand per 5 gallons. Floralicious plus added occasionally. Might add some neem cake this year.

    Worked pretty well for me last year in pots and sips so I'll just keep using it.

    From cup to 1 gallon to 5 gallon bucket to 27.5 gallon half barrel.
    Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you Don! I have been looking everywhere for the half wine barrels myself, they add that old world charm that I just love Interesting about the compost, I've got a heap of it "brewing" outside from last season.. Hopefully it will be ready for use next spring..

    • Jodi
      Jodi commented
      Editing a comment
      Hey Don I have heard a lot about the neem cake as a great enemy for the fig gnats. Have you used it on rooting cuttings? Either as a top dressing or a tea for watering? Great thread here everyone. Very timely for me too. Taking tons of notes. ;-)

    • don_sanders
      don_sanders commented
      Editing a comment
      I've started experimenting with it. To early to really tell if it's making any difference.

      I've mixed it in some soil (1 TBL per gallon of potting mix) with cuttings that I'm rooting and used it as a tea for existing plants (3 TBL per gallon of water).

      You do have to be cautious with seeds and cuttings. It may make them difficult to germinate / root if you use to much according to what I've read.

      The best thing that I've found for fungus gnats is gnatrol (1/2 - 1 TBL per gallon of water watering one ask for 3 weeks). 1 lb on eBay and to be the most cost effective. Forbid for spider mites.

  • #15
    I agree with hammerwood. I experiment with humbolts on 2 tree and growth exploded in 2 weeks much more than normal. Love golden tree
    Two trees with humbolt.



    Back
    About this item
    Features
    ORGANIC - SUPER CONCENTRATED - MAKES UP TO 1,000 GALLONS OF NUTRIENT SOLUTION. Most nutrient companies in the world recommend using dozens of additives that they sell. Replace all of those additives by other companies with Golden Tree. Look in the description for directions.
    GOLDEN TREE IS A PROFESSIONAL QUALITY ORGANIC FERTILIZER that works with trees, vegetables, hydroponics, flowers, soil, hydroponics, coco, fruits, lawns, roses, tomatoes, and everything else!
    GOLDEN TREE CAN BE USED WITH other companies nutrients including: Advanced Nutrients, Canna, General Hydroponics, General Organics, and many more.
    STIMULATES AND ENHANCES THE DEVELOPMENT and growth in plants by enhancing nitrogen assimilation and basal metabolism
    FINALLY HUMBOLDTS 22 YEAR OLD SECRET RECIPE GOLDEN TREE is publicly available and allows growers to grow bigger and better vegetables**enhances photosynthesis and cell division while also increasing protection against fungal, bacterial, and viral infections in plants by accumulating several phenylpropanoid compounds (PPCs) with antimicrobial activity.** **Induces an increase in the level of essential oil and cellulose content** **Enhances pathogen defense** **Accelerates root and plant growth** **Improves the health and strength of plants -Fruits become fuller** **Increases oil production** **All aspects of the plant are enhanced by the combination of organic compounds present in Golden Tree.**
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Taverna78; 01-23-2016, 10:30 AM.
    Zone 5 Chicago IL Wish list:
    1) Rest peacfully Amico Bello Buddy πŸ‘ΌπŸΌ.
    2) This weeks ebay auctions.

    Comment


    • BrooklynMatty
      BrooklynMatty commented
      Editing a comment
      Beautiful plants

    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you for such an in-depth description πŸ˜‰ Just what I was looking for

    • Taverna78
      Taverna78 commented
      Editing a comment
      Prego πŸ˜‰

  • #16
    Grazie... I feel they want to grow belle for me because i love them. Sometime too much but is better then to hate them sì?
    I think we all have tis passion because we can make something from nothing that repay the favor when is old enough to feed us
    Zone 5 Chicago IL Wish list:
    1) Rest peacfully Amico Bello Buddy πŸ‘ΌπŸΌ.
    2) This weeks ebay auctions.

    Comment


    • #17
      Hi Jamie

      I had to search hard to find Fertilome upm, in the end I had it shipped from a nursery in Michigan and paid a huge shipping fee but I guess it was worth it, the three bags have lasted me 3 seasons!
      Rafael
      Zone 10b, Miami, FL

      Comment


      • Jamie0507
        Jamie0507 commented
        Editing a comment
        Wow! Now that is definitely what I would call making that purchase count Rafael! I went to their website and have been looking for distributors as well and it looks like I may have found one within 20 miles! Still have to call to confirm it though, but if they do have it I'll be heading on over to pick some up! It does sound pretty awesome

    • #18
      Well I think we have all picked up something from this thread that will use next season. Some things do break down over time but with figs they grow so fast in containers that not really an issue because of root pruning and things like that. I think the best part about a mixture after you use it over time. You know when to water and when not to. But me growing up in the foothills of Kentucky just an ole country boy I like composting. I clean horse stables on the side so I pile everything up with all of my yard waste then the next year I'm set. Then in the spring I buy some MG potting soil and mix it 50/50 cause its kinda lite away. Then I mix in bone meal, blood meal, lime and worm casting as a top dressing.. Just don't over water or you lose all of the good stuff.. Lol
      Kentucky Zone 6b

      Comment


      • #19
        Hammerwood,

        Can you tell me what dilution and feeding frequency you use with Humboldts when up potting a cutting vs. just regular maintenance.

        I killed all my cuttings last year during the up-potting step from cups to 1 gallon pots (which I'm very near right now) so I'm nervous about feeding young fig trees to say the least.

        I'm thinking of not feeding at all after I up-pot until the cuttings stabilize.

        Thanks!
        Malcolm - Carroll County, MD (zone 6b). Interested in cold hardy figs. Currently container growing, MBVS, St. Rita, Olympian, RdB, Beale, Sal's EL, UCD 184-15s and Desert King.

        Comment


        • #20
          Hi,

          Please understand that I by no means am an expert and that I come to this forum just like everybody else for education and knowledge. Since you've asked me directly I'll answer you. I certainly agree that a newly rooted cutting when up potted is very fragile and vulnerable. I do nothing until I see that it has stabilized and acclimated to life outside a humidity bin. Only when I see new growth do I begin feeding the new plant. I begin then by using Foxfarm Big Bloom and I begin using it at a 50% reduction rate of two teaspoons per gallon. This is a mild all organic fertilizer that young saplings seem to respond to well. Only after the new plant has become established do I attempt to accelerate its growth with the Humboldts Secret Golden Tree. And even then I begin cautiously with a very small dosage. The directions call for 2mil (approx. 1/2 teaspoon) per gallon and I begin using only 1/4 tsp. There are many other products available that probably do just as good but both Foxfarm and Humboldt have developed and marketed their products to the medical marijuana industry. This is a multi billion dollar industry where strong plants and accelerated growth are premium considerations and mean millions of dollars to companies that can develop safe products that assist their growth. In this case I believe what's good for pot is also good for figs.
          Rick - Port Isabel, Texas / zone - 10a

          Comment


          • #21
            hammerwood,

            Thanks for your response. I'll probably be up potting in the next week or so to 1 gallon pots. They are in 16oz cups at the moment and doing very well. I visited another forum member last fall and he suggested the best way to transplant a fig is to water it and then cut away the plastic cup and then add to up-pot. This seemed like a smart idea to me since fig roots are so fragile. The less handling of the root ball the better. From there, I'll wait for it to establish itself and show new growth and then I'll fertilize with 50% BB. How much of your diluted BB mix would you add to a 1 gallon potted plant and how often?

            I'll be potting with 70% ProMix 30% Perlite.

            Thanks.
            Malcolm - Carroll County, MD (zone 6b). Interested in cold hardy figs. Currently container growing, MBVS, St. Rita, Olympian, RdB, Beale, Sal's EL, UCD 184-15s and Desert King.

            Comment


            • hammerwood
              hammerwood commented
              Editing a comment
              Everything you're going to do makes sense to me. As you know figs don't like wet feet. I gave up trying to guess when to water and invested in a decent hygrometer. I move mine outside to a partially shaded area asap. I live in South Texas and its 75 degrees today so even now I probably water them more frequently than folks in a winter climate. Even with my mature plants, I never give them BB more then once a week. Good luck, but I don't think you'll need it. You're going to grow some great plants.

            • hammerwood
              hammerwood commented
              Editing a comment
              Everything you're going to do makes sense to me. As you know figs don't like wet feet. I gave up trying to guess when to water and invested in a decent hygrometer. I move mine outside to a partially shaded area asap. I live in South Texas and its 75 degrees today so even now I probably water them more frequently than folks in a winter climate. Even with my mature plants, I never give them BB more then once a week. Good luck, but I don't think you'll need it. You're going to grow some great plants.

          • #22
            Pro-Mix HP Bio/Myco thanks to Bob C Harborseal6

            Miracle Grow Moisture Control Potting Mix thanks to maimai2

            20% chunky perlite thanks to WillsC

            CocoLoco what I picked up from local ACE Hardware

            More about CocoLoco

            https://www.google.com/search?q=fox+...obile&ie=UTF-8

            Yeah, I am sure I spent way too much money on these silly little fig cuttings that will probably die b4 they make it to the gal pots.
            Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

            Comment


            • Jamie0507
              Jamie0507 commented
              Editing a comment
              Jerry you & I both have spent way too much money! Haha! I just can't help myself really, I must admit I am truly obsessed! Thank you for sharing the soils/mixes you are using this go around! Good luck with your fig babies!

          • #23
            I use a mixture of 50% biochar (burnt rice husk in my case) and coco peat. I supplement with osmocote while in 1 gallon pots. Photos show how I make the biochar. Why? The biochar is inert, drains well, and well aerated. And very cheap. It costs me $25 USD for a small dump truck load of rice husk. Charring it removes weed seeds, insect eggs, etc., and prevents the rice husk from producing heat while decomposing, which could encourage yeast, bacteria or fungal growth. The cocopeat holds the moisture and prevents excessive pooling of water on the container bottom. The Osmocote provides a balanced blend of essential nutrients while avoiding the danger of burning the newly rooted plant with too much fertilizer. And finally, it's all available locally.
            You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 4 photos.
            Last edited by ThaiFigs; 01-31-2016, 09:59 PM.

            Comment


            • Jamie0507
              Jamie0507 commented
              Editing a comment
              Thaifigs you may just have started me on a new mission with this biochar process you are describing! When you mentioned that you use rice husks you said "in my case". Does that mean you can biochar lots of things? I've got to look this up in more detail, sounds very interesting..

              By the way, where are you in Thailand? My husband is half Thai and we were just there visiting family last summer.. In Bangkok and then up country in Khon Kaen.. It is an ABSOLUTELY AMAZING country and I miss the fresh produce available everywhere!

              Sawadee kah πŸ™πŸ˜‰

          • #24
            Yes biochar can be made from many things, but usually it's charred inside a cooker made from a steel drum. But this simplified method will work for any fine granular material that naturally packs dense enough to prevent flames from consuming the material, but loose enough to allow air flow through the pile to the chimney. Tree leaves shoukd work, for example.


            We're in Nakhon Nayok, on the way from Bangkok to Khon Kaen. Next time you're here, stop by for a visit! Maybe we can even trade cuttings

            Comment


            • #25
              Another great material for making biochar is the sawdust made by wood turners (guys n gals who make wooden bowls, vases, and other objects d'art). Most mid sized towns will have a wood turner or two who would be thrilled to have someone collect their wood shavings. Just don't get sawdust from a home building site, it will be contaminated with wood preservative.

              Comment


              • Jamie0507
                Jamie0507 commented
                Editing a comment
                I'm actually discussing this with my husband right now.. We are seriously considering giving it a try! Great idea about looking for someone who may have leftover wood shavings for the reasons you mentioned above.. My wheels are definitely spinning now Thaifigs! Lol
            Working...
            X