X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • JCT
    replied
    I've had a lot of success this winter rooting cuttings in DE. I read this thread with interest and used the unified method for one cutting while all the others were pure DE. After about two months, my initial round of cuttings were doing really well and I needed to make room on the table for more cutting starts, so I up-potted an initial 3 cuttings. I carefully but thoroughly rinsed most of the DE off the roots and did not seem to damage the roots too much. I made two mistakes when I up-potted. My soil medium (potting soil + ~50% perlite) was very wet. It's kept outdoors to avoid gnat issues and it became soaked by the rain. I probably should have just moved these cuttings to another location and just waited until the soil dried out. But I pressed ahead. As I was worried about root rot and wanted to try to dry the soil out a bit quicker, I would put them in a shady spot out in the backyard. In retrospect, this probably just added unneeded stress to the rooted cuttings. They were doing ok for a week or two, but while the top of the soil was drying out, the bottom was still pretty wet.

    In the meantime, I up-potted a fourth cutting. The potting medium was not as wet, but still a bit wetter than I would like. I had used up my previous mix and had to mix more and the bag kept the dirt wetter than i would have liked. At this point the initial 3 cuttings were showing some signs of stress and were drooping. I ended up using a larger pot to hold my potting mix and finished off the bag. It's sitting in the backyard drying out.

    One up-pot was the one that I had used the unified method. A decent amount of roots were showing through the potting medium and it had a healthy amount of leaves. After a week it seems to be doing really well. I reread this thread and for latest up-pot, I left the DE rootball alone and put it into a container lined with my potting medium (which I had dried out by this time.) It's only been a few days, but it seems to have made the transition like a champ.

    So at this point I have 3 cuttings that are borderline. One is completely defoliated, but the tips are still green, so fingers crossed. The other will probalby lose all its leaves, but it looks like its pushing new leaves, so I'm hopeful that it makes it.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	20200404_cuttings01.jpg
Views:	39
Size:	393.8 KB
ID:	738598

    The cutting on the far left is going to lose most of its leaves as well, but I think that it'll keep the last one. As long as there is no root rot it will hopefully survive. In the top row, the right most pot (small green) was rooted using the unified DE method. After a couple of weeks it seems to be doing ok. In the near row, the center green pot, I left the DE rootball intact and put potting soil around it. We'll have to see how it does!
    Click image for larger version

Name:	20200404_cuttings02.jpg
Views:	37
Size:	381.8 KB
ID:	738599

    Leave a comment:


  • mfehmi
    replied
    Originally posted by tve View Post
    I'm confused by the black cups... are they necessary around the transparent ones? Are they to collect heat from light? Or shield the roots from light? What happens if one only uses transparent cups?
    The black cup is for root protection. Young roots are very delicate and sensitive to light and sun. Also, in a dark environment, the cutting develop more fine roots, which are the ones that brings nutrients to the tree or cutting.
    Harvey only uses a black pot, but I like to use both to see the progress of the roots and be able to tell better when they need to be watered.
    I’ve done it also with black pot only with very good results.

    Leave a comment:


  • ginamcd
    commented on 's reply
    It's to shield the roots from the light. It's been debated as to whether light is bad or not a problem for the roots, but many of us choose to let the roots do their work in the dark as that is where they will spend the rest of their lives.

  • 6b_figs
    commented on 's reply
    Wow dude, nice going! The plants look very healthy!

  • tve
    replied
    I'm confused by the black cups... are they necessary around the transparent ones? Are they to collect heat from light? Or shield the roots from light? What happens if one only uses transparent cups?

    Leave a comment:


  • Lucrative
    commented on 's reply
    Well done! Good job being patient, too! It can be hard sometimes, but it makes a big difference.

  • ginamcd
    commented on 's reply
    Great example of what your cutting's roots should look like in coir or peat based mixes at up-potting time!

  • BrandonP
    replied
    Well, held out as long as I could, but I up-potted the Black Mission today. 1 day shy of two months in the cup (started 11/22, up-potted 1/21).
    The root ball held together well. I think one small piece of a root was left behind in the cup. Only had to squeeze the wall of the cup all the way around and at the bottom a little bit to loosen the root adhesion to the cup wall then the rest slid out (I have to do this when rooting in DE too)....to answer LadyGT's question above.

    Hope this is helpful to those considering this method. I've tried many and this is definitely my favorite now.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20200121_191926.jpg Views:	0 Size:	2.76 MB ID:	698533

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20200121_192005.jpg Views:	0 Size:	2.52 MB ID:	698532

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20200121_192416.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.56 MB ID:	698534

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20200121_192957.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.62 MB ID:	698531

    Leave a comment:


  • mfehmi
    replied
    Originally posted by Frank collado View Post
    I am going to try this method for some of my cuttings from Harvey. I just wanted to know, how often do you water the cuttings.
    I always look at the clear pot to see the soil. If it’s getting dry I water it.
    Remember that the rooted cuttings will not have the same water requirements, for example a cutting that is very aggressive and had put a lot of roots and leave will require more water. That’s why I like to watch them individually.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lucrative
    commented on 's reply
    Please see previous posts. Without first hand experience of how you water and what your exact conditions are, I cannot really advise you on this. It's more of an art than a science and it varies wildly depending on many variables. https://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-h...127#post696127

    That being said, this method is much more forgiving of overwatering than any other direct potting method I know of, so hopefully you will find success with it. Good luck! Many of Harvey's cuttings are very good sized, and may allow you to split them into 2. If they are large enough to do that, I would recommend you do it and save 1/2 of the cutting for a later date (maybe 2-3 months from now) when you have more experience under your belt. Experience is often the best teacher.

  • Frank collado
    replied
    I am going to try this method for some of my cuttings from Harvey. I just wanted to know, how often do you water the cuttings.

    Leave a comment:


  • mfehmi
    replied
    Originally posted by Vladimir View Post
    Where do you get these containers?
    I get them from my local supermarket. There are Deli containers for food. I make the holes to fit my purpose.
    if you can’t find them locally, Amazon sell those, just type 32 oz deli container

    Leave a comment:


  • Vladimir
    commented on 's reply
    Where do you get these containers?

  • Lucrative
    commented on 's reply
    You've got it figured out then. That's much better than almost anyone on here. If you're that dialed in on any method, that's the one for you!

  • mfehmi
    replied
    I use Harvey’s method of rooting, since then my rooting success is over 90%.
    i use a clear and a black 32 oz container.

    Leave a comment:


  • BrandonP
    commented on 's reply
    That back left one looks like a monster! I want to see some pictures of roots on that guy!
    Congrats on the successes.
    I have more going now and hope to be able to add further data.

    I'd love to have enough cuttings (and time/space) to do a large comparison between this method and 100% DE and follow the plants from start through about 1 month post up-pot (about a 3 month study). I'd like to see not only which method is more successful, but also which is less labor intensive. Maybe this summer when I get all my current plants outside.

  • ginamcd
    commented on 's reply
    Ah, so this is the "before" picture. Thanks for clarifying. And I would do the same with the one in the back right.

  • Lucrative
    commented on 's reply
    ginamcd These are ones I'm up potting today to one gallons. Upon review, I'm leaving the one in the back right for a couple more weeks.

  • ginamcd
    commented on 's reply
    Those look great! But are you "up-potting" from cups to cups, or are there other pictures that didn't upload?

  • 6b_figs
    commented on 's reply
    Lucrative thanks for answering my many questions, I’m pretty confident moving forward now. I’d say good luck too but it seems you got it dialed in well haha cheers my friend

  • Lucrative
    replied
    More up pots using this method. Its continued to produce results, though I've had failures as well. Most of them were due to when I used the oyster shell grit that grew some fuzzy white mold/bacteria. I haven't had that issue since then. The others have largely been from when I was out of town for 12 days and a lot of them got underwatered. Lost some that were really well rooted, but have been able to save some as well.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Lucrative
    commented on 's reply
    I scrub my cuttings with Dr. Bronner's Castille Tea Tree soap. After that I spray them down with a 10% bleach solution, let them sit for like 30 seconds, give them a fresh cut at the bottom, then put them in a water bath where they will stay for at least 24 hours and at most 3 days, depending on how fast the cutting absorbs the water. I don't use pro mix HP because it's not available around me, but I probably would if it was. My mix is peat moss, perlite, d.e. and slow release granular fertilizer. Not sure exactly on the ratio. Maybe 60% peat, 35% perlite and 5% d.e. As far as pre-moistening the mix, I can't say as far as the weight goes. It's almost impossible to say. You shouldn't be able to squeeze water out of it, but even if you can't squeeze water out of it, it can still be too wet. The mix should hold together when you squeeze it. The air temps in my rooting area go from around 70 at night, and sometimes up to 83-84 during the day, not sure about the soil temps, but above that for air temp and it's too hot. I don't use a heating mat, but the way my shelving is set up, the lights heat up the bottom of the pots above, so it's similar to using one. I can't offer much advise on the wick thing. I have no experience with it. It could work. As far as fertilizer, I have the initial mix with some slow release stuff. I water with superthrive or kelp from the beginning. When there's top growth, I'll start giving it 1/2 strength miracle grow or 202020. I don't have a fertilization schedule I'm married to at this point. Others probably have that figured out better. Hope that helps 6b_figs . Good luck!

  • BrandonP
    commented on 's reply
    Disclaimer..I am not @Lucrative
    Just do it!
    You got the idea (based on the questions you are asking). This method is very forgiving.
    I would make sure any heat mat keeps soil below 78 degrees if possible. I think 72 to 76 is ideal from my experience. My set up does not require a heat mat to achieve this, so I don't use one.
    I use 1 part cheap bleach to 9 parts water for 10 seconds on my cuttings, then I rinse off and allow to dry before wrapping the top in parafilm. I scrape and paint clonex on the bottom.
    1/4 to 1/2 strength indoor Miracle grow dose with mosquito dunks dissolved in once roots show and it needs water.

  • 6b_figs
    commented on 's reply
    Lucrative Hey, I had a few questions regarding this method. I believe the smallest detail can alter the entire process, so here it goes.

    Do you use a bleach solution to soak the cuttings first? If so, what is your bleach solution like to the gallon? Does any Clorox work? Would well water work or is distilled preferred and how long to soak the cuttings for?

    Will pro-mix hp work, also what is your mix made up of exactly per ratio?

    When you say pre-moisten the mixture...if you were to take a 32oz cup of pro-mix hp and spray it down with water to get it moist, what would be the weight difference if scaled?

    What temperature and humidity do your cuttings root in?

    Do you use a heating mat, if not, would it help?

    What type of fertilizer do you use if any, and when do you introduce it to the cuttings, when they are rooted or just starting?

    Would a wick work well for this method? That way the cup doesn't sit in water but absorbs it via wick?

    Wow, sorry for all of these questions. I'll be trying to bring up some supers and would really like a step by step of this method as I think it is one of, if not the best I've stumbled on.
    Much appreciated, hope to hear from you soon. Cheers

  • Lucrative
    replied
    Just an added note because I'm having a lot of people asking questions about watering/how much/when, etc. Watering will be different for everyone given your rooting setup, where you live (humidity levels), and countless other variables. Watering is somewhat of an art, and while this method is much more forgiving of overwatering than other direct planting methods, you can still kill your cuttings by watering too much.

    I'm finding that the mix around the d.e./perlite will start to dry out and at that point, you should water. I use a spray bottle most of the time (sometimes a turkey baster) and basically when you spray the surrounding potting mix, the d.e./perlite gets watered as well. At some point in the process, the bottoms of the cup may start to dry out, and in that situation you can place the cups in very shallow water to allow them to soak up a little bit of water from the bottom.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X