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  • Worm Castings / Worm Farming

    Who here either uses worm castings or has a worm farm to collect their own?

    I have wanted to employ some worms for a while now to get rid of compost and kitchen waste etc but havent put the time into getting it setup. Well a local friend of mine was heading to another country for 3 months and wanted someone to worm sit. So I took over her smaller worm farm and we would split castings and worms when she got back. I decided to order some additional soldiers and they arrived yesterday. I am in the process of making a larger stacked bin setup but for today I put them in the smaller bin with the others. Who is doing this as well? How is your success with it? Any tips, tricks, dilution levels for the tea that comes out the bottom and how much of the castings are you putting around each small plant. Drying them first or straight? Favorite Tea recipes etc etc. Im oddly excited by this venture and my girlfriend is oddly ok with it too. LOL

    The new bin setup will be very much like this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srTrDpxm1Uk



    Attached Files
    2021: The year of figs and a new love of Citrus thanks to http://www.madisoncitrusnursery.com

  • #2
    Hi Lou, I put together a semi-detailed write up of my vermicomposting process here: http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=15110.0

    The end results produces a beautiful bacterially rich (vs a fungally rich) compost that is perfect for gardening. Most fruit trees (and trees / perennials in general) want a more fungally dominated soil. So I also do thermophilic composting in 2 cu.yd. batches with a higher C:N ratio and let it age so that the beneficial fungi can grow (they like things undisturbed). So when I make a compost tea I will take some fungal compost and feed it powdered oatmeal to give them something to really feed on and multiply a week or so before brewing. Then add in a handful of the fungal compost + handful of vermicompost to the brewer. This gives a huge variety of beneficial microbes to the tea!
    Location: USDA Zone 9b / Sunset 13. Chandler, AZ

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    • #3
      I've wanted to do this for awhile but haven't out the time into it yet. I need to find a good tutorial on making the multi layered bin setup cuz they can be expensive. Def something to look into for a spring project.
      Bryan | Zone 7 NC

      Wish List: Takoma Violet, Kathleen Black, BM, Preto, CdD Grise and Noir, Ventura, Maltese Falcon and Maltese Beauty.

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      • #4
        When you are ready watch this tutorial. You just take 4 bins from walmart the ones I bought are $15 each but you can get the cheaper ones. Drill 12-15 holes in 4 of them and you are done. You can put a bulkhead fitting on the bottom one to make a drain or just lift them all out and drain it. Almost no work required to be honest.

        The new bin setup will be very much like this:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exdXKk3iBPY
        Last edited by LouNeo; 01-29-2016, 07:18 PM.
        2021: The year of figs and a new love of Citrus thanks to http://www.madisoncitrusnursery.com

        Comment


        • LouNeo
          LouNeo commented
          Editing a comment
          ROFL I updated to the worm bin video it was supposed to be. hahaha But hey at least it was still a worm bin video. *links been updated* trying to update the main post link too lol

        • LouNeo
          LouNeo commented
          Editing a comment
          For some reason it wont let me update the original link so just for the record the original link is still worm bin related but theres definitely a sexy, sultry entrance LOL So if you are offended by that sort of thing, skip right to the gruffer link here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exdXKk3iBPY

        • WillsC
          WillsC commented
          Editing a comment
          Sometimes being an admin has it's advantages......I like the first link you posted BETTER

      • #5
        I use worm castings as a soil additive. I don't do vermiculture because composting worms won't survive my winter and I don't want a soldier fly infestation in my house. Even if they don't bite.
        Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

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        • #6
          Its been 25 here a bunch of nights. I put my worm bin in an uncovered larger bin, put some cut open "hot/cold" food bags around and on the bottom of the bing bin. Then put a 50ft strand of led xmas lights wrapped around the bin a bunch of times. Tossed a burlap bag on top and its sitting in my unheated garage. The bin stays 70 0 issues
          2021: The year of figs and a new love of Citrus thanks to http://www.madisoncitrusnursery.com

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          • #7
            Where there is a will there is a way. Sounds like a good set up. I like the video about the guy saving all of the worm juice idk if you seen that one. That is a good video. The price of worm castings will make anyone start a worm farm. If you have alot of trees and need alot of castings. I just like using all of my own stuff.
            Kentucky Zone 6b

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            • #8
              Lou I have had a 3 tray composting system for about 5 years, I use Uncle Jim's red wigglers, they are not too hungry in winter, when I have less vegetable matter around the house, they do love summer and all my extra fruit clippings. In all that time I only had to replenish the colony once. I used to move them into the garage in summer but for three years now they have been in my basement, apparently the worms prefer a more stable environment. The tea from the spigot is NOT worm tea, it is called leachate, and experts are divided on whether is is useful or not. I dump it down the drain.
              Rafael
              Zone 10b, Miami, FL

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              • #9
                Sometimes being an Admin has it's advantages, I like the first link you posted better
                Cutting sales have ended for the season. Plant sales will start March 1 at 8 eastern time. If it is still too cold in your area I can hold your plants till a date of your choosing.

                Comment


                • LouNeo
                  LouNeo commented
                  Editing a comment
                  hahaha As soon as he said how much he liked the video.. I knew I had posted the wrong link lol

              • #10
                Apologies for my ignorance but How come can't put worms into tree pot?
                Zone 5 Chicago IL Wish list:
                1) Rest peacfully Amico Bello Buddy πŸ‘ΌπŸΌ.
                2) This weeks ebay auctions.

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                • LouNeo
                  LouNeo commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Theres no reason you couldnt put some worms in the tree pot, they would aerate the soil but its doubtful they would make any noticeable effect in nutrient count because of the sheer number of them you really need in order to make enough castings or worm tea from the castings. But obviously in nature they are just a part of the ecosystem under and around the roots.

              • #11
                Give them prunes and docalax then they poo all over! aHahahaha

                πŸ›πŸ’©πŸ’©πŸ’©πŸ’©πŸ’©πŸ’©
                Zone 5 Chicago IL Wish list:
                1) Rest peacfully Amico Bello Buddy πŸ‘ΌπŸΌ.
                2) This weeks ebay auctions.

                Comment


                • #12
                  I do put native worms in my tree pots. If I thought they'd stay I'd use the vericomposting worms.

                  Best of luck with your Vermiculture. It's a great thing to do. I looked into it and decided it wasn't for me but I admire those of you who do it just as I admire beekeepers. If you come to visit bring a bag! Last year I used probably $240 worth of worm castings. I don't need that every year, though.

                  For those of you that think 25 is Winter, I'm happy for you. I hope you never see Christmas lights frozen in ice. Most of Canada would consider my Winter to be their Spring. Now if I had room in my garage in the winter I would definitely do it.

                  I'm curious, how many of you have seen soldier flies? How much volume of castings do you get in a growing season? Thanks.
                  Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

                  Comment


                  • smatthew
                    smatthew commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I've got a soldier fly bin. It doesn't really produce castings. Lots of foul leachate which goes straight onto the compost pile.

                • #13
                  Bob 30 years of my life were spent in Massachusetts 25 is not winter it's just what winter is now lol. There's the start or flies in my bins but as soon as they fly out into the unheated garage they don't seem to survive well. Can't help with volumes just yet though.
                  2021: The year of figs and a new love of Citrus thanks to http://www.madisoncitrusnursery.com

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                  • #14
                    I know I have read that while worms are very beneficial in the soil in a pot they are not good for the plant at all.
                    Cutting sales have ended for the season. Plant sales will start March 1 at 8 eastern time. If it is still too cold in your area I can hold your plants till a date of your choosing.

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                    • #15
                      Originally posted by WillsC View Post
                      I know I have read that while worms are very beneficial in the soil in a pot they are not good for the plant at all.
                      Do you know why? I assumed they just burrow down & out, leaving some fertilizer and making some trace elements available as they go.
                      Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

                      Comment


                      • LouNeo
                        LouNeo commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Seems like a "In Moderation" type thing. "Earthworms and wigglers alike feed on living and dead root tissue at times, which may negatively affect plant growth when the burrows disrupt the root's growth process. This is typically only an issue if a large worm population is present in one plant pot."

                      • Harborseal
                        Harborseal commented
                        Editing a comment
                        You mean, "because the moderator said so"?

                    • #16
                      Bob,

                      I'm really not sure, just know I have read it before because it surprised me. I had figured the worms would be beneficial but I guess not.
                      Cutting sales have ended for the season. Plant sales will start March 1 at 8 eastern time. If it is still too cold in your area I can hold your plants till a date of your choosing.

                      Comment

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