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  • What is wrong with this fig plant?

    This is a tissue culture plant I got at the end of summer. Repotted it along with three others.Once they established roots in the new container I got a sucker growing and then cut the original stem to the soil surface. This produced vigorous new healthy growth. Except with this one after it grew to this height it developed this weeping stance with the leaves. What you are looking at is not from under watering.The leaves are stiff. Also, the roots have all turned brown and unlike the other three I do not notice new root growth. I also do not believe it is not from over watering, as I water with a scale and it is being watered in the same manner as the others. It gets a good watering and is then given several days to get to a fairly dry soil then watered again. Anybody know what is happening here?

  • #2
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    • #3
      It's hard tell,. If the roots are turning color, it's in trouble. Probably root rot, try adding a little compost to the top, or repot it again with new soil add a touch of compost to battle root rot, also try watering with 1/2 cup hydrogen peroxide per gallon to oxygenate roots and sterilize soil.

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      • #4
        I agree it looks like a root problem. along with what Andrew said you may want to take a couple of the leaves off, the roots may be stressed enough that they are having a hard time supporting the whole plant
        Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana
        Buffalo WV Z6

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        • #5
          I vote root rot as well.
          Calvin, Wish list is to finish working on the new house, someday.
          Bored? Grab a rake, paint roller, or a cordless drill and come over!

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          • #6
            I would put it in a regular pot, the clear 2 litter bottle is exposing the roots to light. This with correct watering hopefully will solve the issue.
            Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

            “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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            • #7
              The plant is clearly in wet soil but I see an aeration hole and I assume you have drainage holes. All to the good. Now just because you measure an amount of water doesn't mean it's the right amount You are there and we aren't. If you squeeze some soil will water come out? If it's more than a small amount relative to how much soil than that's too much. If you take out a pinch and squeeze if a drop comes out and runs down your hand to your wrist that's too much. It may very well be that there's nothing wrong with the leaves. If they have turned to face the light, that's their job. Check under the leaf stems with a flashlight to see if there are any fine webs or tiny critters. If so rubbing alcohol sprayed on the whole plant full strength or safer's soap or neem oil will take care of that. They can cause stems to bend.

              Since the leaves are good (assuming, as you said the stems and leaves are stiff and not floppy - they look good to me) there may not be anything wrong with the roots. As they thicken they naturally turn brown, with or without light. So show us the roots. Are they thin and brown and limp or are they thick and robust? If they are thin and limp you know your soil is too wet. The real problem with wet soil is not the water per se but that air can't get to the roots because they're surrounded by water. If the roots are unhealthy you know you have to change the potting medium. Otherwise every time you water the roots won't get enough air.

              On the other hand, often when you increase pot size the roots go on a growing spree and the buds hang quiet for a while. You can over come this with fertilizer but only if you want the plant growing vigorously and can accommodate 1-3 months of growth (depending on where you live) in your current environment.

              BTW, we can always give you better advice if you include an approximate location and growing zone in your post or signature.
              Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

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              • #8
                Thank you for the replies. There are no spider mites. I agree there is a root problem. I just thought there might be a specific reason. Maybe I'll just have to settle for there is a root problem and try to do something to fix it. Root problem or not I find it strange though.

                Bob: When I pot a plant I gauge the soil as far as wetness. I prefer to pot with slightly moist, not dry soil. Once potted I weigh it and write the weight on the container. Then I water it moderately.Now I have a reference point. Once it has a good root system I don't worry about giving it a good watering, as long as I let it dry out well before re watering. Something went wrong with this one though.

                I'm in zone 7A. South Jersey

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                • Harborseal
                  Harborseal commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Well, good luck with it. Will you repot it or what's your plan? NJ is home to some of the best fig growers on the planet

              • #9
                It's already been said but my thoughts are too wet also. No insects, not to dry then my money is on too wet and possible root rot. Sometimes we think we have It all figured out then Mother Nature lets us know that we don't.
                newnandawg 7b Newnan, GA

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                • #10
                  Yes. I am going to repot. This time I will incorporate a good amount of Promix HP. The mix I used was fairly heavy in sand and although it worked fine for the other three maybe this particular plant just isn't ready for that mix.

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                  • #11
                    If the leaves are stiff and not wilting like you said, it could be more of a light issue. How much light does it get?
                    https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
                    SE PA
                    Zone 6

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                    • #12
                      It doesn't get much light. Definately on the low side. If anything I would think it would reach for the light and orient its leaves to best capture the overhead light(which is where it is coming from)

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                      • #13
                        Either way, figs like a lot of light.
                        Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                        “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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