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  • How And When To Fertilize Rooted Fig Cuttings

    Hi, everyone. I’ve had a number of people over the past year ask me about when and how to fertilize fig cuttings after they begin rooting. I spent some time this week putting together a comprehensive video on the topic. I just posted it on YouTube.

    This covers everything from why you should do this to when, and shows you how I do this myself. I tried to cut it down to be as short as possible, but there is a lot of info there so I couldn’t get it below 16 mins. Sorry

    Anyway, I’m sure many people here are at the stage where their cuttings have rooted and they need a feeding. I hope this helps!

    Zone 8A Southeast NC Coast
    Subscribe via YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/c/TheMillennialGardener
    Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NCGardening

  • #2
    "what's growing on, everyone?" hehe....I see what you did there.
    Evan....I mean Eric.
    SoCal - Zone 10a

    Comment


    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      I wish I could take credit. Even I’m not cheesy enough to make that one up 😆

  • #3
    Thanks for posting the video. I do forget these cuttings need nutrients too. I am often too obsessed with making sure they don’t rot that the cuttings themselves run out of their own energy in all that inert media that they can start to drop their leaves, I had this happen to a few cuttings now. Think I’ll be giving them some miracle grow real soon.

    Great watching your videos, they are informative and inspiring.
    RHS rating H3 (USDA zone 9)
    Wish list: Zaffiro, LSU Champagne,
    Italian 258, RdB, Smith, Yellow Long Neck

    Comment


    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you, I appreciate that. Having healthy cuttings prior to transplant will help them grow and produce faster first year for sure.

  • #4
    Thank you for this video. It was extremely informative and helpful!
    Zone 10b, Southern California

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  • #5
    Thanks, really useful information.

    Comment


  • #6
    Perfect timing!!
    Thank you😊
    Piney Point Village, Zone 8b

    Comment


    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      I tried to time this one out! Thanks for watching.

  • #7
    Perfect fertilizing tutorial ,well done and very clear .
    Thank you.
    Rio
    Montreal Canada Zone 5

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  • #8
    Well done young man. Always informative and helpful.
    South Florida - 10b

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  • #9
    TheMillennialGardener, Great job on your video! No doubt there are a lot of winter rooters that have plants at or close to the stage of those you have shown. Your information takes the guess work out of fertilizing young rooted cuttings. Thanks for sharing. 👍
    Ed B. West Coast of Michigan L.P. 6a/6b

    Comment


    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks, that means a lot. I appreciate you watching.

  • #10
    Excellent video Millenial !
    Thank you !
    Looking for De La Gloria.Your best teacher is your last mistake !

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  • #11
    Nicely done “golf clap”
    Zone 8b. West Central Louisiana

    Comment


    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      The respectful half-clap. I'll take what I can get! Thanks for watching.

  • #12
    Nice video, Thanks for sharing!
    San Diego County, CA - Zone 10

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  • #13
    Enjoyed it too. Clear and concise. TY.
    Tony. Pickens county, SC zone 7b Growing: BT, (southern?); Unk Green
    WL: Atreano; Azores dark; Brooklyn White; Florea; Godfather; Golden Riverside; Lattarula; LSU Early Improved Celeste; Maltese Beauty; Maltese Falcon; Napolitana: Tiger Panache

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  • #14
    Another great video. Where were you last year before I figured this out?
    I just wish I had watched your fertilizer regiment video earlier in 2019.
    I did a great job up potting all my cuttings and had 100% success.
    My issue was not getting food to the plants early enough after up potting.
    They eat through the food in my mix very fast.
    The next mistake I made was to not introduce enough Phosphorus after the initial Nitrogen feedings.
    I grew wonderful, healthy plants - few figs though.
    I am armed with more knowledge for 2020.
    I appreciate your help.
    Zone 8B - Cottage Grove, Or
    Wish List - Raspberry Tart to be common!

    Comment


    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      Now you'll have a direct comparison: last year versus this upcoming year with the new techniques. I'm convinced figs are voracious feeders and just can't seem to get enough fertilizer.

  • #15
    M.G.,Thanks!

    You provided me with some answers regarding the reason for the moldy deaths of some of the cuttings in my previous rooting attempts! This should help in this years batch of cuttings.


    Zone 6B Shawnee Mission KS
    Wish-list to get most of the bundle of cuttings sleeping quietly in my refrigerator bin to root!

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  • #16
    Wonder if a slow release N crystal in soil mix could help. Been leaning that way to help with inevitable (N)eeds
    WNC zone 7a at the intersection of Mt Pisgah & the Blue Ridge Parkway

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    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      Try blood meal. It is very cheap, 100% organic and it releases very quickly. Nitrogen is often an easy solution, but it's also easy to overdo. Too much will ruin a fruiting season.

  • #17
    Thanks so much for sharing this. I have several cuttings at this stage, and had no idea granule organic stuff is useless at this stage. In fact not one hour ago I started 4 brand new cuttings with some fertilizer added to the mix, thinking I was helping them. My mix contains a very small(probably less than 15%) amount of worm castings and aged manure compost so I may some small amount of soil biology, but not much I’m sure.

    Have you ever used DynaGro products? Personally I stay away from anything miracle grow
    Zone 9B WL: Violeta with one ‘T’.
    all other wishlist cuttings have been acquired

    Comment


    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      mwhight34 yep, organic granules have to be broken down by soil biology into useful micronutrients. Since these little cups don't have a diverse soil microbiome (and if you're using coir, peat and perlite, they're "sterile" and have no microbiome at all!), they won't break down into useful nutrients for your plants. You have to use a soluble feed that's already broken down so the plants can use them immediately.

      The only chemical solubles I've ever used is the MiracleGro brand (and the Expert Gardener knockoffs). I use MiracleGro due to availability and cost. It's everywhere. I don't have any ethics problems with the brand because the ethics problems with MiracleGro are inherent to practically every fertilizer out there. My belief is me growing my own food and using small amounts of MiracleGro on my annuals and container plants is much friendlier than buying from the grocery store - but that's just my opinion. You may use any brand you choose as long as the N-P-K ratio is appropriate and you're sure it's soluble and immediately bioavailable.

    • mwhight34
      mwhight34 commented
      Editing a comment
      @TheMillenialGardner thanks for the reply! I wouldn’t say I have any moral objections to MG, I’ve just had real bad luck with their bagged soils( fungus gnats galore) and fertilizers in the past with other plants and like to use other brands, preferably organic, but sometimes that’s just not feasible with rooting medium. Very helpful video though! Great idea watering with the baster, i went and bought one today for this purpose👍🏻

    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      @mwight34 I fully agree with that. Any time I bring soil into my house, I bake it for an hour in a roasting pan. Any brand can be infested with fungus gnat eggs. The only way to ensure they're dead is to bake them. I usually do 325F for 1 hour.

  • #18
    Great video! thanks a lot
    The Ultimate Fig Database by Rigo

    Zone 10a

    Comment


  • #19
    Great intro to fertilizing for those who are new at growing! And if anyone ventures beyond figs into something like growing vegetables from seed, the same principle applies -- let the seeds initially use their stored energy to germinate, then begin weak applications of water soluble plant foods.
    “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”
    – Chinese Proverb
    MA 5b/6a

    Comment


    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      Precisely. When you get down to it, most fruiting plants are the same - figs, tomatoes, peppers, peaches, apples, eggplant, etc. I fertilize my figs just like my tomatoes. The figs are just the heaviest feeders I've ever come across.

  • #20
    Awesome video! Look forward to seeing the next video in the progression to full tree!
    Zone 7a Westchester County, NY
    Wish List: Figo Preto, Bordissot Negra Rimada, Col De Dame Blanc, Smith, Cravens Craving, Noire De Barbentane, Strawberry Verte

    Comment


    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you. I'll make sure to keep posting regular updates.

  • #21
    Perfect timing. I have a half dozen in fig-pops that have leaves wilting. I went straight to Wal-Mart and got the fertilizers you recommended and will be feeding them tomorrow. I am going administer the fertilizer a little different. Instead of a turkey baster, I am going to use a marinade injection system so I can keep the fig-pops sealed. Will have to add some holes in the bottom of each bag for drainage. If this doesn't work well for me, I'll up pot to 3"x7" mini pots and try again.
    Edward - Edgewater, Florida (Zone 9b)
    Wish List: Burgan unk, Bass's Favorite, Thermalito, Holy Smokes, Angelo's Dark, Ham Rham

    Comment


    • TheMillennialGardener
      TheMillennialGardener commented
      Editing a comment
      Are your leaves wilting because the medium is drying out? Sometimes figs that rooted successfully will start to rot, and that will cause wilting. That happened to one of my cuttings this year - it was first to root, then started to rot, wilt and it died. A sad story, but luckily the 2nd cutting is doing great.

    • efletche
      efletche commented
      Editing a comment
      I have 6 where the leaves just wilted and dried up. I moved them from the fig-pop bags to a 3"x7" mini tree pot. The medium in the bags were completely dry. By using the marinade injector, I am hoping to prevent this on the others and give them some nutrients at the same time.

  • #22
    Extremely helpful information, thank you.
    South Florida, Zone 10B
    Wishlist: Azures Dark, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Black Madeira, Campaniere, CdD Noir, CdD Blanca Negra, CdD Gris, CdD Roja, Cavaliere, I-258, Golden Riverside, Sucrete.

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  • #23
    Thanks for watching and for your feedback, everyone. I appreciate it.
    Zone 8A Southeast NC Coast
    Subscribe via YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/c/TheMillennialGardener
    Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NCGardening

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