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  • Cuttings Usage Poll: Root, Graft etc.

    One more poll, how do you use your cuttings? Curious what the community is doing. Sorry for all the polls, to me it is a great reference, quickly and easily digested.
    52
    Root all
    50.00%
    26
    Graft all
    5.77%
    3
    50:50 cut a piece to graft, root the remainder
    11.54%
    6
    Graft expensive cuttings, Root cheap ones
    7.69%
    4
    50:50 cut a piece to graft, root the remainder with expensive cuttings. Root cheaper ones.
    9.62%
    5
    Root, Graft attempt after failed rooting attempt.
    5.77%
    3
    Other: explain
    9.62%
    5
    Zone 7a VA

  • #2
    I generally grow the vast majority of figs on their own roots but try grafting with maybe about 5% of varieties. These usually have low vigor such as Ischia Black (UCD) and get grafted onto a high vigor rootstock. I also sometimes graft varieties that I have mixed feelings about (i.e. considering culling but not quite ready to totally give up on yet so they go onto a multi-graft tree).
    Steve
    D-i-c-k-e-r-s-o-n, MD; zone 7a
    WL: Zaffiro, Izmir, St. Martin

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    • #3
      I'm about 90/10% rooting to graft attempts. I have a fair amt of BT rootstock available. I still need more practice with grafting techniques.
      Tony. Pickens county, SC zone 7b Growing: BT, (southern?); Unk Green
      WL: Atreano; Azores dark; Brooklyn White; Florea; Godfather; Golden Riverside; Lattarula; LSU Early Improved Celeste; Maltese Beauty; Maltese Falcon; Napolitana: Tiger Panache

      Comment


      • #4
        Cut off a piece and root the remainder. I graft anything I want for sure, or anything I have failed rooting in the past. Most would laugh but right now I have a RDB graft because I can't seem to root it for some reason (failed twice). I also have an LDA graft going because I wanted to compare the source to my existing tree and want to make sure I have success. I know if I graft it, I will most likely have that variety. With rooting, nothing is a guarantee.
        Brooklyn, Washington. zone 8b, rainy winter, mild arid summer
        Wishing for: Tashkent, LSU DC 4, 6, I-258/GN AF, De la Reina, Becane, Tx-BA1, Gris de St. Jean, Adam

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        • #5
          I've been grafting all the small stuff. I have a bunch of small diameter root stock, so it's just easier to get the cuttings to take this way. I'm thinking that I might ramp up this system by starting a few dozen extra spring cuttings and keeping them small for next winter. I still prefer to root the big, chunky cuttings.
          Springfield, OR - Zone 8b ISO: San Miro Piro, Hative d'Argenteuil, Campaniere, Planera

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          • #6
            My cuttings are expensive this year so, 100% grafting those to inground trees. I prefer rooting green cuttings in the spring and fall when they can be outside and not checking them every other day. I will root some of my pruned cuttings from my trees for rootstock in the future. With grafting I get over 90% takes, rooting I get around 50% to 60%, so no brainer for me.

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            • AndyG
              AndyG commented
              Editing a comment
              Wow, I'm batting the complete opposite, only worse. I've only tried several grafts though. Maybe I'll practice grafting a bunch of my mulberry trees cuttings back onto itself this year for practice...

          • #7
            Ideal world: I would graft everything onto healthy/vigorous rootstock if I could. No frankenfigs.
            Zone 7A - Philadelphia
            Flavor Profiles & Variety List / Facebook / YouTube / Blog

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            • #8
              I like rooting anything I can IF i have another decent cutting to graft as a backup.

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              • #9
                So far, I'm a purist -- everything on it's own roots.
                “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”
                – Chinese Proverb
                MA 5b/6a

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                • #10
                  I started experimenting with grafting onto cuttings as an insurance when I have a single cutting.

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                  • #11
                    So far just rooting. But the grand plan starts soon: two in ground trees > lots of grafts at the end of next month > lots of air layers this spring > cut down to stumps > graft two varieties to each stump.
                    Zone 10a | San Diego 92126 | Wishlist: wasps, "San Diego" figs (figs with a history in San Diego), one great honey fig, Harry's Crete, Vincenzo, Thermalito, CDD Mutante, Del sen jaume grame, Calderona, Lampeira Prusch

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                    • #12
                      I tried a handful of grafts last year but they all died. I've since read that if you do a graft you should wrap it to prevent it from drying out until it takes. I only wrapped around the graft area, so maybe that's what I was doing wrong. I'll try it again this spring and see what happens.

                      For rooting, I'm waiting until spring and putting them in one gallon pots of compost. This avoids the up-potting step, which is where I lost most of mine.
                      Zone 7B/8A Wake Forest, NC. Wish list - 1. To stop murdering fig cuttings. 2. To find the biggest, juiciest, cold hardiest, most delicious common fig in the world! (and not murder it)

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                      • #13
                        I root all, and graft varieties that are known to due poorly in desert climate or have weak root systems.
                        The Ultimate Fig Database by Rigo

                        Zone 10a

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