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  • Figaholics cuttings need cleaning?

    As post title suggests. Is it a good idea to sanitize cuttings from Harvey?

  • #2
    It's probably a good idea to sanitize any cuttings from anyone
    Zone 10b, Southern California

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    • #3
      short answer:

      "If you want it done right, do it yourself."
      Zone 6B PA

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      • #4
        Sure. Why not? Takes just a short spray upon delivery.
        Oregon City, OR (Zone 8b) by Portland.

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        • #5
          Yes, they require cleaning. A handful of mine molded when they didnt get a soak in antifungal.

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          • #6
            any cutting from areas wherethare are likely fig mites (like CA) in my opinion are best immediately on opening package soaked in a solution of 2 proven miticides such as Avid and Forbid a few hours and then in dilute bleach and allowed to air dry before either immediately placed in rooting media or dry in zip bags in refrigerator for later rooting/grafting.You may hear objections here from some folks, but Nobody gets hurt and can avoid getting problems as Jeremiah here will attest.He got mites and fmv before he learned. Wish you well.
            Z8A NC SANDHILLS

            WISH LIST BURGAN UNK, ZAFFIRO,

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            • #7
              I was thinking of 1 cup bleach per 1 gal of water for 1 hr soak, any suggestions? Might do a hydrogen peroxide water 50/50 solution to moisten my peat moss. Thought / Comments?
              Myfigs:https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...QMA/edit#gid=0. WL: RDB, Raspberry Latte, Malta black, Galacia Negra, Black Zadar. Spokane, Wa. Z6

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              • #8
                Originally posted by shawnjames70 View Post
                I was thinking of 1 cup bleach per 1 gal of water for 1 hr soak, any suggestions? Might do a hydrogen peroxide water 50/50 solution to moisten my peat moss. Thought / Comments?
                I feel bleach might be too harsh. But don't have any data to justify that feeling. I just use copper fungicide with physan20.

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                • #9
                  I soak mine in 10% bleach (by volume) in warm water for about 1 minute. The cuttings do fine but I don't know for sure if that that kills everything you would want to be killed such as fig mites.
                  Steve
                  D-i-c-k-e-r-s-o-n, MD; zone 7a
                  WL: Verdolino, Figue Jaune, Nantes Maroc, Lussheim

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                  • Cguitar
                    Cguitar commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I do the same Steve and use an old toothbrush while they are in the 10% bleach to lightly clean them.

                • #10
                  I just wanted to throw it out there that I remember reading somewhere Harvey also treats his cuttings with something. So it’s always wise to wash!
                  Menifee, CA. Zone 9a. MotherofDragons on Fig Database/FigBid. WL: VdB, Burgan Unk.

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                  • #11
                    HarveyC does treat them with a fungicide. I’ve forgotten which one.
                    Mark -- living in the CA banana belt, growing bananas, figs, and most any fruit I can fit in my small, crowded yard.
                    Wish List: Raspberry Tart, De La Senyora (Sineuera), Tia Penya, Cosme Manyo, Roeding #3

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                    • #12
                      Just to be odd man out, I never wash my cuttings. I’ve never had problems. Probably best practice to wash, especially for bugs.
                      Last edited by Heavy2600; 01-14-2020, 09:32 PM.
                      Volcano, 7a VA

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                      • #13
                        I would think that household bleach, diluted 1:10 would kill mites after 5 min or more treatment. I searched the Internet but found nothing. Does anyone know?
                        Worcester, Massachusetts, Zone 6a - In containers 1 gal - 15 gal. Wish list: Dore' de Porquerolles

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                        • JLB
                          JLB commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I haven't seen that to be the case I soak in a ten percent bleach solution with a few shots of dish soap after washing with that same solution and still have cuttings showing signs of FMV .I think yatama is correct though I haven't tried either yet they are expensive but may be worth it

                        • venturabananas
                          venturabananas commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I don't know the answer, but while bleach could kill mites, its not going to kill the FM virus inside the fig plant tissues, so I wouldn't expect a miticide or bleach to affect whether the cuttings show signs of the virus.

                      • #14
                        No info .But why wonder about things other than PROVEN effective miticides like FORBID and AVID. Here I limit my gambling to occasional fun in potentially shark infested surf! My figs I baby.
                        Z8A NC SANDHILLS

                        WISH LIST BURGAN UNK, ZAFFIRO,

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                        • Rewton
                          Rewton commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I have Forbid and have used it outdoors. However, I would be wary of using it in-doors on cuttings. My cuttings won't go out-doors until April or so.

                        • YATAMA
                          YATAMA commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Rewton.Absolutely! here I soak cuttings outside on arrival in the miticide and then bleach solution and let dry outside My rooting site is in basement, far away from living area. I suspect bleach water likely decomposes the mticides. a recommended AG practice when I had my cherry orchard was to use strong bleach/water inside spray tanks& equipment to deactivate herbicide or insecticide residues immediately after use. Also alkaline solutions are claimed to deactivate the miticides so much that manufacturers specify acidifying the spray solutions with added acid like vinegar etc so the spray retains effectiveness in the tank more than a few minutes to hours. so likely a good dose of soda in water to clean up residues makes sense. Here any miticide solution leftover gets bleach added and then placed in sun to dry out the water, before I toss the plastic container with the dry residue in a fire. Not cool to pour on ground as is bad for aquatic critters.Like everything else there are responsible and irresponsible ways. Here use tiny quantities but take no chances with poisons. I also glove up when using them and burn gloves afterwards

                      • #15
                        I scrub cuttings in water with a brush and then transfer them to a 10% bleach solution for a soak (minutes) when pruning at home.
                        SoCal, zone 10a

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                        • venturabananas
                          venturabananas commented
                          Editing a comment
                          And if you are storing cuttings for more than a month or two, you might want to give them a second bleach treatment after a couple of months of storage if they are looking dodgy.

                      • #16
                        Our cuttings are first washed in water (birds often have muddy feet when perching on our branches) which has been effective for removing dirt and insects such as thrips (based on testing done by our ag inspector when getting a phyto) and we also sanitize with StorOx (more effective than bleach according to a study at Michigan State University when tested for sanitizing chestnuts) and also Chinosol fungicide (a sulfur compound). You can always take more time and scrub with a bleach solution and a brush, if you wish.
                        My fig photos <> My fig cuttings (starts late January) <> My Youtube Videos

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                        • shawnjames70
                          shawnjames70 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I did not know this... nice!

                      • #17
                        When rooting these dormant cuttings, I’ve heard that you need to soak them in water before sticking them into the soil. How long of a soak is required, if any? All my experience is with non dormant cuttings
                        Tulare county CA Zone 9b/10a
                        Wishlist: on hold until 2021

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                        • Rewton
                          Rewton commented
                          Editing a comment
                          You don't need to do that but it is thought that the hydration from a water soak for 12-24 hours gives them a faster start, especially for older cuttings that might be a little dried out.

                        • venturabananas
                          venturabananas commented
                          Editing a comment
                          If you are rooting cuttings from Harvey as soon as you get them, they definitely won't need a soak. After a couple of months in a crisper, or with ones that weren't handled carefully, yes, but not with Harvey's cuttings when they first arrive.

                        • mwhight34
                          mwhight34 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Thanks guys. These cuttings will all be going into the crisper drawer after a 10% bleach soak. I share a room with my figs for the winter and it’s getting a bit crowded, so these new ones will be rooted in spring, outdoors

                      • #18
                        Kudos to HarveyC for his cutting treatment.

                        I looked up Stor Ox, it is a Pera Acetic Acid product. Widely used for food products, food processing facilities, water disinfection, etc. An advantage is it fully breaks down leaving no harmful residue or contamination.

                        It is a strong oxidizer and personal protection is required.

                        https://www.allamericanchemical.com/...esentation.pdf

                        Johnson1
                        Zone 9b
                        S of Tampa Bay, FL

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                        • #19
                          If I have a suspect cutting, I dip it in the Benz-all solution I use at my clinic to sterilize instrument. Think I’ve seen someone mention using this (benzalkonium chloride) before on the forum.
                          Hilliard Lawler, DVM, Indianola, Mississippi Zone 8A
                          "Home of BB King" https://bbkingmuseum.org/
                          wish list: Col. Littman's Black Cross

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                          • #20
                            I don't use bleach because I'm just too clumsy and even a 10% solution stains my clothing every time. Plus, I don't think even several minutes in dilute bleach is a very effective disinfectant. At work we used to autoclave equipment, which is very effective, but would kill cuttings in short order. So I've used antibacterial soap scrubs and SA20 soaks. That may not be any more effective, but it makes me feel I've done something before I store them and my clothes don't suffer.
                            Tony; Pickens county, SC zone 7b
                            WL: Brooklyn White; Dominick; Golden Riverside; Maltese Beauty; Norland

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                            • Otis
                              Otis commented
                              Editing a comment
                              I agree that bleach is a remarkably effective disinfectant. I just think that the amount of exposure it would take to be effective on cuttings would kill them also.

                            • venturabananas
                              venturabananas commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Fungi really don't like bleach, and that fungal rot is what we want to avoid with cuttings. In my experience, a quick soak (several seconds to a few minutes) really wipes out the fungi on a cutting, without harming the cutting. But please use whatever you feel comfortable with.

                            • Otis
                              Otis commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Absolutely, pathogens are tough little buggers, and we'll all do whatever we feel will increase our chances of success. My clothes just can't take working with bleach, and when I try to do it naked, the neighbors complain.

                          • #21
                            Has anyone used apple cider vinegar as a healthier alternative?
                            Also, neem leaf tincture possibly? I also heard for the rooting, some folk use honey and dipped into cinnamon to prevent root rotting
                            David
                            SW MO Zone 6b

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