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  • What Fertlizer Fig Trees Require?

    I have been fertilizing my fig tree the same fertilizer that I give my citrus trees that's specific to Arizona soil (13-10-4) but want to know if Fig tree requires different balance or this would this good enough ? also I saw a lot of you tube video's for people using Epsom salt to enhance absorption and I am thinking about using it this year. I would like to know your thoughts on this issue especially from fellow Arizona's. Thanks.
    Chandler, AZ Zone 9b

  • #2
    Each winter I fertilize the area around the trees with about 2 pounds of manure, 25 grams of triple superphosphate and 25 grams of potassium sulfate per square meter. I do not use nitrate fertilizers in mineral form.

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    • #3
      Interesting, thanks for the input
      Chandler, AZ Zone 9b

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      • #4
        Soil Tests are the usual recommendations for in-ground Fig Trees and Plants, with supplementation of deficient nutrients. I grow my fig trees in containers and usually Feed ~ 3-1-2 (NPK) plus secondary and micro-nutrients for at least the first 1/2 of the growing season with reduced Nitrogen (N) for the latter 1/2 of the season (~ 2-1-2 or 2-1-3 with Secondary and Micros)...

        But there has been several discussions about "optimal" fertilization requirements for Fig Tree Cultivation in Soil. Good luck.

        https://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/15714/PDF page 137
        IV. Horticulture
        ... Fig trees adapt to marginal conditions easily, as they are tolerant to high soil calcium content, salinity, and drought (Aksoy 1998; Golombek and Ludder 1990).

        A. Site Selection
        ... In addition, figs tolerate soils with pH ranging from 5.5 to 8.0.

        D. Irrigation and Fertilization
        ... Literature concerning fig-tree fertilization is scarce. From a practical viewpoint, the fertilization requirements of figs depend on soil type,organic matter content, and pH, as well as on the nutritional demands of the crop. Figs prefer alkaline soils, so lime has to be applied if the pH is lower than 6.0. The optimal pH ranges between 6.0 and 8.0.


        Proebsting and Tate (1952) observed that foliar concentration of net and total nitrogen decreased during the growing season. Similar results were obtained by Proebsting and Warner (1954), who noted decrease of Nitrogen and Phosphorus content as the season progressed, while Potassium content increased up to the middle of the growth season and Calcium and Magnesium contents increased gradually from the beginning to the end of the growth season.
        https://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-h...attention-pete
        The Japanese Commercial fig Orchard prescriptive fertilizer schedule for in ground Espaliered trees is;
        8-7-7 Organic fertilizer (a ratio of 1-1-1) with an added boost of Potassium Sulfate (0-0-50) when the figs are at the stagnant stage.
        The indicated season is from April to October with the Potassium applied in July.
        They start with prepared soil with average fertility and pH adjusted to 7.2 ~ 7.5
        Pierre Baud, http://www.fig-baud.com/pageanglaise.html
        7-3-7 for vegetative growth with
        6-3-10 for fig growth and development
        4-8-12 or 10-20-25 for "well balanced soils"

        Japanese Commercial fig Production, http://www.hawaiifruit.net/Figs-Japan.htm
        10-8-10 for normal production
        14-10-7 for trees 25 years and older.

        https://www.ourfigs.com/filedata/fetch?id=94735
        Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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        • #5
          You are correct in asking for input from other fig growers in AZ. What is best for another area may not be ideal for yours.

          To start, are you growing your figs in pots or inground? What media are you using?

          The PH of both your soil and water are relevant too. PH can directly influence nutrient availability.

          Your county agriculture extension agent can be a great help with their recommendations. They are knowledgeable on your soil types and fertilizer needs.

          AscPete and Richard have written guides to fertilizing.

          Also realize there is no single right answer.

          Johnson1
          Zone 9b
          S of Tampa Bay, FL

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          • #6
            Thank you for the valuable feedback
            Chandler, AZ Zone 9b

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            • #7
              I'm fairly new to this, but from what I've read, unless your soil is really deficient in a particular nutrient, ( soil test or local Ag agent are great suggestions), figs are really not very fussy when grown in ground.
              Tony. Pickens county, SC zone 7b
              WL: Angelo's Dark; Atreano; Azores Dark; Brooklyn White; Dominick; Florea; Golden Riverside; LSU Early Improved Celeste; some Maltese or Italians; Napolitana:

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              • #8
                there was a research in Egypt and Israel that showed for mature bearing trees moderate heavy potassium fertilizer applied early spring resulted in much heavier yields and higher quality figs. they did nt discuss other fertilizer. here I have 0-0-50 to use as the cheaper 0-0-60 is chloride which is not real good for some plants.. But old timers knew wood ashes had potassium as well as helping combat acid soils so I put my ashes around all my fruit crops as are FREE!
                Z8A NC SANDHILLS

                WISH LIST BURGAN UNK, ZAFFIRO,

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                • cybercop
                  cybercop commented
                  Editing a comment
                  This is true. Figs, strawberries, potatoes, pumpkins and tomatoes are a big consumer of potassium. This element should therefore be provided to them. I also put some ash around the trees, but in the winter I bring in and slowly dissolve potassium sulfate.

                • XstreamINsanity
                  XstreamINsanity commented
                  Editing a comment
                  What wood ashe is good to use? For instance, does pine have a higher/lower yield than say oak? I just cutdown a dogwood and have plenty wood for burning to use. Reading this appeals to my frugal side.

              • #9
                what is a cheap way to get ashes without burning them yourself?
                Wish List: I don't even know at the moment. A mild winter for nice growth in the Spring I guess?

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                • emor525
                  emor525 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Hang out at a lot of BBQs

                • ofon
                  ofon commented
                  Editing a comment
                  well damn I better get in touch with all my old college friends now lol

              • #10
                I doubt anyone here has data on chemical analyses of pine VS Oak ashes, However here we simply go for it and use whatever is available.I cook with wood fires a lot so always have a supply to scatter. I know ash also contains other trace elements plants need which is why it was in the wood in the first place.One thing though, some research found that wood thats burned and turned into char but not totally consumed to gray ash may contain plant toxic chemicals that inhibit plants.

                As to getting ashes withut burning them ones self? Am flabbergasted! answer is get from someone else who does !
                like-- neighbor who burns leaves, construction site where scrap wood gets burned. Logging site where loggers burn waste , site where land is being cleared of trees for construction. etc.
                Z8A NC SANDHILLS

                WISH LIST BURGAN UNK, ZAFFIRO,

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                • Richard
                  Richard commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Relative to other common wood ashes, hardwood oak has a higher potash content than pine.

              • #11
                figneer IDK the exact answer, but being just up the road from you I know your native soil is only slightly better than mine and it's very high pH...so any conversation about wood ash is not good for us. You've got sources for good compost in your area, I'd start there and then amend during the season with "P" as the trees show the need.

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                • figneer
                  figneer commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Will do thank you

              • #12
                I'm south of you, in Tucson. I've had great success with foliage pro.
                Tucson - 9A

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                • figneer
                  figneer commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thanks figue, I will look into it

              • #13
                I am in Tucson Az, and I use the epsom salts. It does make a difference. One year I did one pot with it and one without it and the one that I used it on seem to almost double the growth rate of the pot without. I also use epsom salts for my citrus and stone fruit trees.
                Erin: Catalina/Tucson, AZ. Zone 9a
                Wish list:
                Coll de Dama Noir, Black Tuscan, campaniere, White Madeira #1, Mt. Etna, Ischia Black, Rasberry Latte, VDB, Dalmatie, Golden Rainbow

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                • figneer
                  figneer commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Hi fig girl, do you combine Epsom salt with fertilizer or only use the salt?

                • TahomaGuy2
                  TahomaGuy2 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Agree totally on the epsom salts application. Soil here in the coastal Pacific NW totally lacks magnesium and fig plants reach for the sky when they get some. Just don't overdo the application!

              • #14
                figneer
                https​​​​​​​://docs.google.com/document/d/1...it?usp=sharing
                Fruit crazed in Vista CA. http://tangentvectors.org

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                • figneer
                  figneer commented
                  Editing a comment
                  thank you for sharing

              • #15
                I use just the epsom salts, I either mix it in hot water if i am watering potted plants, not to give too much, or i just sprinkle some on the ground around trees and water in very well for plants in the ground.
                Erin: Catalina/Tucson, AZ. Zone 9a
                Wish list:
                Coll de Dama Noir, Black Tuscan, campaniere, White Madeira #1, Mt. Etna, Ischia Black, Rasberry Latte, VDB, Dalmatie, Golden Rainbow

                Comment

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