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  • LSU Fig Differences

    These questions are for an LSU figspert! I've been looking into some LSU figs that may be (maybe not) in the same flavor group. I'm hoping someone would share their experiences for a comparison. I realize the answer may be subjective in relation to personal taste. These questions take time to answer so an immediate response is not necessary. Thanks in advance for any help you provide.

    I'm looking for Ripening time and length (early, mid, late, or everbearing), Sweetness comparison, Productivity comparison, Eye description, & Rain and Split resistance comparison for the following LSU figs:

    Scott's Yellow
    Champagne
    Golden Celeste (amber pulp)
    Hollier
    Gold
    Cajun Honey (?)
    Ken NW Florida 8b. WL: Buzzone Nero, a healthy Coll De Dama Blanca or Col De Dame Blanc.

  • #2
    This would be nice

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    • #3
      CajunB is your expert on this topic.
      Piney Point Village, Zone 8b

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      • #4
        Champagne is a great honey fig, yellow skin with sugar spots when ripe. Medium size fig, spilts here in rainy seasons, tight eye.
        Hollier is really close to champagne for me but the interior has some pink instead of totally amber. Personally I like champagne better. Both grow like crazy, hollier hasn’t split yet, small eye.
        Gold has a slightly greener skin but still yellow when ripe, larger figs also. Interior is light amber, tastes great if you like honey figs. I haven’t had any split yet. Eye slightly open but nothing to worry about.

        Cajun Gold is just like LSU Gold but more productive, from what I’ve been told. I’m rooting some now so I’ll know first hand this year.

        i don’t have Scott’s yellow or Golden Celeste.

        Now Scott’s Black is a great fig too.
        Zone 8b. West Central Louisiana

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        • Sod
          Sod commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks CliffH I thought Brian said it was different. No matter. I’m still left with that conundrum of whether I need any more honey figs. I just don’t know.

        • Sod
          Sod commented
          Editing a comment
          Sorry you lost it BTW. That sucks.

        • CliffH
          CliffH commented
          Editing a comment
          Sod - Yeah, that really sucked. It died so quickly that I could not even get air layers. From the first that I noticed the infestation to dead tree was less than 3 weeks. But Brian recently sent me cuttings from two different variants of JL. One of them he says is the same as my pictured fig.

      • #5
        Techno101, Thanks for the info.
        Ken NW Florida 8b. WL: Buzzone Nero, a healthy Coll De Dama Blanca or Col De Dame Blanc.

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        • #6
          You might want to put LSU Tiger on this list
          WV Harpers Ferry Zone 6b

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          • #7
            Are LSU Scott's Yellow and LSU Gold the same fig or different?
            Northern CA 9b W L- Ponte Tresa, White Madeira#1, Lampiera Prusch, Thermolito, Calabacita, Prat st. U. Rigato del Salento Pb

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            • Rickyv101
              Rickyv101 commented
              Editing a comment
              They are different, LSU SY , It figs is small to med size with red flesh with long neck, LSU gold fig is med to large size and more like donut shape with small open hole, flesh is yellow with light red hue. Their flesh color can change base on where you are or pollinated.
              Last edited by Rickyv101; 02-06-2020, 06:29 PM.

          • #8
            I can't speak to all of them.
            Here, LSU Gold was a splitter in rain
            Hollier and Champagne are smaller than Gold, also honey flavored, but Hollier had a better or richer flavor at times, while Champagne may have been slightly more productive than Hollier. Both were less likely to split than Gold but were more likely to split than the Mt Etna type figs.
            Ed
            SW PA zone 6a

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            • blaze
              blaze commented
              Editing a comment
              Yep my experience as well 200 miles to the east. Culling Gold and Champagne and Scott's black. rooting scotts yellow. Decided I "need" 20 keeper mature tree varieties some (Smith 5) with multiple copies and will keep trying new baby ones each year. Should keep me at 100 or less which is where I am trying to stay.

          • #9
            Thanks again for replies.

            eboone Ed,
            So Hollier is richer and more complex. This might be an arm twister! 😋

            Last edited by Toejamken; 02-16-2020, 04:24 PM.
            Ken NW Florida 8b. WL: Buzzone Nero, a healthy Coll De Dama Blanca or Col De Dame Blanc.

            Comment


            • #10
              Does Scott's Yellow have a closed eye for breba and main crop?
              Ken NW Florida 8b. WL: Buzzone Nero, a healthy Coll De Dama Blanca or Col De Dame Blanc.

              Comment


              • #11
                It's been a while since I read it, but I remember Dan from Louisiana writing there is a Golden Celeste with Amber pulp; not Champagne; and not with pink/rose pulp like Texas A&M donated to the national germoplasm repository. If this is incorrect, let me know? If anyone knows about or is growing this fig please share what you know as well? Thanks.
                Ken NW Florida 8b. WL: Buzzone Nero, a healthy Coll De Dama Blanca or Col De Dame Blanc.

                Comment


                • #12
                  One thing to keep in mind when gathering people's experiences with these figs is that there are different variants (or even mis-labels) out there.

                  I know there are at least 3 different figs that go by the name "Golden Celeste". That is for the actual real Golden Celeste. In the nursery trade the names Champagne and Golden Celeste is often used interchangeably by growers. This is just like the names Improved Celeste and O'Rourke. I have also recently learned that there are 3 different variants of the LSU Jack Lily.

                  I will also add to the information that has been given by others above for the varieties that you listed. My experience so far is that LSU Scott's Yellow has been very similar to LSU Hollier. But my tree is only about 3 years old. If this continues, they are too much alike to keep both (unless you just want a "LSU collection", which I did consider).

                  I have had a problem with my larger in ground Champagne dropping figs. I am hoping that it will have out grown this behavior this year!


                  CliffH
                  Texas (N. Houston area) - zone 8b
                  Wish List: Rubado, Calderona, Cavaliere, GM-172, and GM-25

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                  • #13
                    As Ed reported, my LSU Gold was not a durable fig...splitting and waterlogging in the rain. When the weather cooperated, dead ripe figs were sweet, but not very flavorful, nor abundant in fruit production.

                    LSU Purple is a keeper. Shiny purple figs in abundance, on the shy side of medium sized, 40 grams max., with a surprisingly rich flavor, are how I would evaluate mine.

                    My LSU Scott's Black is young, but the few figs it ripened last summer were very good. I expect it to be a keeper.

                    That's all for LSU figs in my herd.

                    Thorntorn
                    W. PA., Pittsburgh, zone 6b USDA, but more 5b, realistically. All pot grown fig trees, no in-grounds.

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                    • CliffH
                      CliffH commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I am not sure that I can remember having a LSU Gold split on me. But they can definitely become water logged easily. They are a large juice filled fig in normal circumstances. When they get too much water is when I use them for making preserves. They are still very sweet, and make a great base of sweet fig flavor in combination with other fruits (i.e. strawberry, blackberries, lemon, etc).

                      I think that LSU Gold is one of those figs that really need the long and hot summer weather of the southern climates to develop its best flavors. Like the Alma fig, it is not one that I really recommend that often for northern growers.

                  • #14
                    CliffH & Thornton, I'm soaking all this up, thanks. It would be good to know more about three Jack Lilly variants. That might make it hard to release if you don't choose one.
                    Ken
                    Ken NW Florida 8b. WL: Buzzone Nero, a healthy Coll De Dama Blanca or Col De Dame Blanc.

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