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  • Dog run as winter fig shed

    I have a concrete pad 6'X10' (I think). I want to convert it into a fig shed over the summer for next winter for the wintering the figs. I really don't have a lot of other options. My basement is finished and heated. I already have a very large outdoor shed which is full of various machines and "stuff". No room in there for figs. So the concrete pad which used to be a dog run seems a likely candidate. Anybody have any ideas how I might go about this? How to secure walls to the pad? Making it fairly well insulated to be heated with light bulbs?

  • #2
    Hi Blackfoot12.
    I would buy a 6x10 shed anchor it to concrete and insulated, probably just as cheap as you can build one.
    Good luck with it.
    Vito

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    • #3
      Then use a high wattage GREEN incandescent bulb on a thermal black to stave off the cold. Your not trying to heat the shed, you are only keeping if from getting to cold.
      Last edited by COGardener; 02-17-2016, 12:13 PM.
      Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

      “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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      • #4
        How much sun does the concrete pad get in the winter? Maybe a Greenhouse instead?

        I like vito's idea of buying a shed and then anchoring the base to the pad and insulating it.

        Any idea what you'd use it for in the summer time?
        Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

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        • #5
          How to secure walls to the pad?

          About the quickest and easiest method would be to cut a 2-by perimeter frame and utilize a nail gun that uses .22 blanks. ( http://www.homedepot.com/p/Ramset-Ma...0088/202046595) They can be rented for $15 or so.
          CA 9b "May you sit under your own fig tree..." This metaphor, in use since Solomon, is a wish for the receiver's spirit to know peace, for their family to be secure, and for their life to be fruitful.

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          • #6
            You can buy a ramset for $20.00.

            I would not recommend using a ram set, especially in a very windy location unless you use a ton of nails and even then, it may lift. You would be better off using a hammer drill and setting anchors into the concrete then bolt down the shed / greenhouse with large washers.
            Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

            “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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            • #7
              If you live in a windy area and since the slab is already in place so set-in anchor bolts are not an option, I would follow up any method you use with hurricane straps. Drive long helical anchors into ground near the foundation and s cure the hurricane straps to the building and to the anchors.

              Belt and suspenders.
              Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

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              • #8
                Bryant, Sounds like you are thinking of the bent foundation anchors.

                Here is what I'm talking about:

                http://www.homedepot.com/p/Hilti-1-4...2346/204993044

                or

                http://www.homedepot.com/p/Red-Head-...1273/100203093

                Part of job is to engineer and mount equipment to new or existing concrete slabs. These anchors WILL work perfectly provided the correct ones in the correct quantity are installed correctly.
                Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                Comment


                • DBJohnson
                  DBJohnson commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Yes, but what you have in mind seems quite sound. The hurricane straps would be additional protection if in a very windy area. I tend to prepare for the worst and over engineer things. You know....belt and suspenders.

                • COGardener
                  COGardener commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Yeah I have that issue as well Bryant over do everything. LOL

              • #9
                The shed needs to be able to withstand 40 MPH winds. It gets moderate sun in the winter via afternoon sun. I would prefer an actual shed not greenhouse. Too close to the forest and falling branches.

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                • #10
                  Bryant: How do you "s cure the hurricane straps to the building? What is "S Cure"?

                  Thanks

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                  • DBJohnson
                    DBJohnson commented
                    Editing a comment
                    "s cure" is a typo for "secure".....sorry about that.

                • #11
                  Scott:

                  Those two links. The first link is the anchor for the product in the 2nd link?

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                  • #12
                    Two different products.

                    The first requires a bold and washer sold separately.

                    The second is all inclusive yet I would use an additional and much larger washer.
                    Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                    “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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                    • #13
                      Scott: Do you believe the drop in anchors will work better than wedge anchors?

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                      • #14
                        Personally I prefer the drop in anchors. When the hole is drilled to the proper depth and cleaned of dust.... the drop in its properly seated with the seating tool. They they don't come out.

                        The wedges are very good, however they do sometimes start to lift with a lot of torque. I've pulled them out cranking on the bolt and replaced them with drop in's.

                        Now, that said, some of the environments I work in and around are very extreme and require a extreme torque.
                        Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                        “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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                        • #15
                          OK, good advice. Thank you.

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                          • #16
                            Any time. 😉
                            Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                            “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                            Comment

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