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  • Ronde de Bordeaux

    Ronde de Bordeaux! Please share any photos or experience you have, and also post photos on the varieties index.

    Another top choice for cold climate growers, Ronde de Bordeaux (RdB henceforth) is an excellent French variety translating to "Round of Bordeaux". It is the likely the hardiest French variety. The name refers to it's very round fruits, of course. It also has nice, long finger like lobes.

    RdB is amongst the earliest main crop varieties, around the same time as Improved Celeste and Malta Black (70 days, mid-August in mid-Atlantic) and only after Florea. It is able to ripen good fruit even in cool summers when other varieties may not. A very vigorous grower (up to 6' per season!), it can be affected by FMV but seems to outgrow it easily. Some have stated it may be hardy through zone 5. Certainly able to be grown in ground to zone 6, but it will likely die back most years. It will fruit well (50+ fruits) even after being killed to the ground.

    Very good, jammy sweet figs that are small. Purple skin with red flesh, it's taste is a favorite of many. Check out the top 5 thread, it is on at least half of the lists! That many figgers can't be wrong! Baud notes that some years RdB will set brebas, but it is uncommon and they usually fall off. kubota1 has said they are very good, better than many main crop figs.

    I planted one out last year, but my only photos of it would be the pile of mulch and snow it is sleeping under! High hopes for this one in my yard.
    https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
    SE PA
    Zone 6

  • #2
    Also, if anyone has a variety they'd like me to write up, let me know and I'll see what I can do!
    https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
    SE PA
    Zone 6

    Comment


    • #3
      I bought a RdB last winter. On new growth, it ripened 2 main crops. It was putting on a third when frost hit. I thought it was not supposed to do that. The first crop was fantastic. The second was OK.
      You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.
      PPP
      Eatonton, GA zone 7b/8a

      Comment


      • #4
        I've been very happy with this fig. One of the hyped figs that lives up to its reputation. Good growth, attractive, good taste, though smaller fruits. What more could one want? It does well in zone 10 too. A winner.
        SoCal, zone 10.
        www.ourfigs.com Invite your friends.

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        • #5
          This is an excellent variant. Its taste was nothing much to crow in its young age but after year 3 of fruiting, it is excellent.
          In my zone, the main crop ripens from mid Sept onwards. What I would like to know is whether there is a possibility that
          there is more than one strain of RdB.

          Comment


          • cis4elk
            cis4elk commented
            Editing a comment
            I like to hear that, last year was the first year bearing for mine. I have no plans on getting rid of it,even if the flavor didn't improve it is good enough stay. For me it ripened way ahead of everything else. And I even got some 2nd main crop figs.

        • #6
          Kelby, thanks for the comment about outgrowing FMV symptoms. I started my RdB cuttings on 1/16 and 3 out of 4 seem to be exhibiting strong discoloration and some irregularly shaped leaves. The cuttings themselves seemed to leaf out way ahead of all the other varieties that I started at the same time. I was concerned that I might have to get rid of the RdBs because of the virus.
          Alma from Maryland 7b

          Comment


          • Kelby
            Kelby commented
            Editing a comment
            That's just from I've read, I think Robert Harper made that comment. Makes sense from what I've seen, though. Hope they do well for you!

          • Gina
            Gina commented
            Editing a comment
            If you are going to collect/grow figs, you are most likely going to have FMV. Many will outgrow it and have healthy-appearing plants.

            FMV can reduce vigor and probably production in sensitive plants, or those infected with more than one strain of the virus, but most fig growers don't pay much attention to it. It apparently can also make a tree less hardy.

        • #7
          Everyone should own one at least. For me it ripened great tasting figs until late november in not so optimal conditions.
          If i could keep only 5 trees RDB would definitely be one of them.
          You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 3 photos.
          Rotterdam / the Netherlands.
          Zone 8B

          Comment


          • #8
            And yet another great sounding fig, I have two cuttings that are rooted and just pushing growth. I am hoping for the best with them and can't wait to taste the fruits of my labor if I'm successful in transitioning them to 1 gallon or larger outside.
            Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

            “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

            Comment


            • #9
              My daughter certainly enjoys them!
              You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.
              Frank ~ zone 7a VA

              Comment


              • nickawwad
                nickawwad commented
                Editing a comment
                adorable, i have a 6 month old daughter, that i can't wait to give her figs!. believe it or not, i have a 7 year old that i am still struggling to get to try his first fig!

              • Altadena Mara
                Altadena Mara commented
                Editing a comment
                Are you sure these are RdB? All my RdB are round like its name suggests. None of mine are long like in the picture. It looks like a great fig in any case.

            • #10
              What a great fig for New England !
              If someone wants just one variety here in NH this is the one I encourage them to get , along with Florea if they want a second one.
              You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 7 photos.
              Kerry - NH zone 5
              Wish list - Del Sen Jaume Gran , Angelito ,Thermalito , Exquisito , Campaniere, Teramo , White Madeira #1 .

              Comment


              • xenil
                xenil commented
                Editing a comment
                Gratulation!
                Excellenet looking figs, a truly reliable variety even in your cold climate.

              • cjmach1973
                cjmach1973 commented
                Editing a comment
                Is yours in ground or in a pot?

              • drivewayfarmer
                drivewayfarmer commented
                Editing a comment
                I have 6 in large pots and one in the ground.

            • #11
              Mine did so well in a SIP last year, that I made a late season air layer. I'm going to put this one in the ground to see how it like the clay.
              Frank ~ zone 7a VA

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              • #12
                My in ground tree is grown on clayey soil. Performed very well with over a hundred
                ripe figs. I grew it in bush form. No winter protection for 3 yrs. Had a die back in the 1st yr.

                Comment


                • #13
                  Anyone try growing RdB in hot humid climates? Does it have an open eye or a closed eye? Thanks, I am really interested in trying this variety in North Central Texas
                  Wishlist:Violette de Sollies, CdDN, RdB, Petite Negri, Franks Salerno, Florea, LSU tiger, Longue d’aout, black jack, I-258, Brooklyn white, black mission, smith...

                  Comment


                  • #14
                    Originally posted by Kelby View Post
                    Also, if anyone has a variety they'd like me to write up, let me know and I'll see what I can do!
                    Could you do a write up on Brown Greek, Toni's Italian Brown, Guilbeau French, or King Alfred? I learned the hard way not to just put the tags in the pots where I had planted my trees--the squirrels dug them up and had them strewn all over the place. I had to guess at which variety is which.

                    Comment


                    • Kelby
                      Kelby commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I'll see what I can do, probably won't have any time until winter though!

                  • #15
                    Hi, new here, just bought my first fig tree, it's the Ronde de B. I live in the Pyrenees mountains and my house is at 900mtrs. The house garden faces south so it gets a lot of sunshine. In the winter we get a lot of snow for 2 weeks and is very cold, should I expect any problems?

                    Now I just need to work out where to plant it in the garden.

                    Attached a photo.

                    Thanks.
                    Click image for larger version  Name:	fig-rdb.jpg Views:	1 Size:	79.4 KB ID:	154727
                    Last edited by Dave65; 04-14-2017, 11:28 AM.

                    Comment


                    • don_sanders
                      don_sanders commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Welcome. How cold is cold? Figs can take around 20F or so unprotected. Lower than that and you want to look for hardier varieties that might get you down a few more degrees or protecting them in some way. Planting in a warm microclimate may help some as well.

                  • #16
                    after some mild winter dieback, my rdb decided to put out thousands of suckers.
                    it didn't bother with fruit .i found all those 3' suckers ugly.
                    i dug out all but 3 stems.
                    one sucker rooted nicely in a pot. in case i like the taste.
                    it came thru this past winter well, protected.
                    i'll test pinching on this one, in a few months.
                    most of my trees are too full to chance extra branching.
                    mine shows no disease so i'll give it a chance.
                    susie,
                    burner of trees
                    high plains, maybe zone 7.

                    Comment


                    • Altadena Mara
                      Altadena Mara commented
                      Editing a comment
                      My RdBs like to make branches and grow out rather than up. That's fine with me since each branch is covered in figs.

                  • #17
                    I planted one in the ground last summer. I protected it with a barrel full of mulch and garlic in the bottom to keep the voles away. It had good growth last year-hopefully I get figs on it this year.
                    Hi my name is Art. I buy fig cuttings-so I can grow more figs-so I can sell more figs-so I can buy more fig cuttings-so I can grow more figs....

                    Comment


                    • #18
                      Dave65 Welcome to the forum. You will want to search here for how various people winter protect their in-ground fig trees. May be best to emulate those that are in the same weather zone as you are. I've heard of some in cold zones who do not protect at all, but that is usually only for vary mature trees.
                      Wendy - zone 6b - Central Kentucky .....My Fig List
                      WL - Bass' Favorite, Bordissot Negra Rimada

                      Comment


                      • Dave65
                        Dave65 commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Thanks for the help. Will do.

                    • #19
                      RdB is one of my favorite figs. I have three trees in the ground. Last year the older tree had an abundant early and a late crop with the figs ripening over a long period of time. A younger tree had enough figs to confirm that it was RdB. This year none of the RdB trees have an early crop yet. My Unknown Pastillere that matched RdB's production early and late last year has large fruit on it already. All my stone fruit trees are loaded with fruit from the winter rains. I'm not sure why there are no RdB figs yet.
                      Last edited by Altadena Mara; 04-15-2017, 12:33 PM.
                      Mara, Southern California,
                      Climate Zone: 1990=9b 2012= 10a 2020=?

                      Comment


                      • Altadena Mara
                        Altadena Mara commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Update 5/1/2017 The brebas on Unknown Pastillere shriveled up and fell off.

                    • #20
                      I hope to have at least one RdB tree, I have six cuttings I just started yesterday. How will this variety perform in high heat and humidity?
                      Scott Head
                      Friendswood, TX - Zone 9a
                      Black Gumbo Southern Gardening

                      Comment


                      • #21
                        RdB is a favorite of chefs. I gave several high end varieties to a grower in St Louis and an affiliated chef couldn't get over the RdB. They love the uniformity and size as well as the taste. The CdDs didn't impress the chef as much.
                        Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

                        Comment


                        • #22
                          I have this one and like it. I have only grown it one year, so still figuring this one out. One of the earliest figs I have is Unk. Teramo, not much info at all on it. Not only early it's a darn good fig. Looks like breba from it will mature before any of my other figs. So for me it's the first of the season. I have Florea, and many others too. Main crop is very early too, or was from a cutting. We will see with breba and all, how it does.

                          Comment


                          • #23
                            Under ideal growing conditions, if I were going to sell chefs on fig fruit, one dark fig and one light fig, of the varieties I've ripened I would be inclined to go with Ronde de Bordeaux and Mary Lane (which may be Kalamata, at least very akin). RdB and Mary Lane can look the most like, say, professional fruit. They have no neck, and they are quite round. No neck like apples, blueberries, oranges, strawberries, kiwis, grapes, mangos, many berries, tomatoes also, like most all of the most popular fruits except the crazy bananas. Especially round, no neck, good flavor - RdB and Mary Lane.





                            You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 9 photos.
                            Last edited by mountainfigs; 04-22-2017, 05:41 PM. Reason: added a ninth photo
                            Tony WV 6b
                            https://mountainfigs.net/

                            Comment


                            • Rayvino
                              Rayvino commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Tony - I don't want to change the subject of this post, but how do you rate the flavor of a properly ripen MaryLane compared to other whites?

                              Also, you last photo, #8 it could be the camera but the fruits look, blueish/purple, are those RDB?

                            • mountainfigs
                              mountainfigs commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Ray, photo 8 is a closeup crop of another photo, which I just added above as photo 9. I don't know if the look is due to the photo itself, the closeup, or the cropping. RdB can turn almost black and be well ripe. As best I recall in person those figs looked nearly black.

                              Mary Lane is a late ripener. So far here, it has a very good light taste, kind of mild, kind of neutral, kind of light honey, kind of light agave. Quite similar to my somewhat earlier ripening Long Yellow. It can wow you with its juicy lack of intensity, if that makes sense. A lot of the honey figs have a bit of resinous bite to them that can be pronounced and not always pleasant. Not Mary Lane and Long Yellow, as I've grown them at least. These have been unusually juicy very light honey tasting, or agave flavored. Not intense like a lot of berry figs, or biting like a lot of honey and sugar figs. Very refreshing and juicy and, again, light. The pulps of these agave figs, as I call them, have been significantly lighter appearing in color also, as compared to the many honey figs.

                            • Rayvino
                              Rayvino commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Thanks Tony

                          • #24
                            The best! I have 3 in 15 gallon pots and will put at least one in ground this year.

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                            • #25
                              One of my wife's favorites... never did much for me though...

                              https://youtu.be/bUsq1nAhkaY
                              Youtube: PA Figs eBay: tdepoala
                              Wishlist: Galicia Negra, Paritjal Rimada, Black Ischia UCD

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