X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Large container drainage problem

    I bought a 5 years old unknown fig tree potted in 20 gal large container in last Oct and I am thinking to proceed root pruning right now or not. I tried this afternoon, but it was too big and heavy to handle by myself. Therefore I only removed 40% of the potting soil and replaced with new Pro-Mix potting mix. Then I found the draining of the large container is not very good. so can I use drill to make some small holes from the bottom and lower part of the container to ensure better drainage without remove the root ball outside from the container ? The unknown fig tree is about to wake up from dormant now. I am not sure if this will kill the root ball not to grow well later on the year or not.

  • #2
    Yes you can. I did the same on a 20 gallon pot i drilled 5/8 hole spread out six inchs apart. Keeps stagnant water from building up from bottom and along bottom sides. Dont push drill in too far wouldn't really hurt the tree if you did.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've drilled 3/4" diameter holes in the side (at the bottom edge) of filled containers with a stepped drill bit (Vari-bit) they are easy to use and are available relatively cheap from Harbor Freight, http://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-qua...ill-44460.html . The small amount of root damage is minor, since its only a very minor root pruning. It should not hurt or damage the tree. Good Luck
      Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks very much to all for the respond and I really appreciate it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Pete you have a good idea using a step bit.

          Comment


          • #6
            I've done it, too, as a stop gap, but root pruning works better.
            USDA Zone 9b Wish list: Abruzzi, Pasquale, Filacciano, Tagliacozzo, Zingarella, Godfather. Any, including unknowns, from Abruzzo, Italy.

            Comment


            • pacifica
              pacifica commented
              Editing a comment
              Hi Joann, Unfortunately I was not able to take the root ball out from the pot and for root pruning as expected because the tree was very bulky and heavy. In fact I made a lot of holes near the bottom of the pot to perform as air pruning instead of root pruning. Hope that this will work better as well.

          • #7
            Pacifica,

            For air root pruning in a standard container with bottom drainage hole a Pot Liner system is much more effective, http://treebag.com/potprunerdifference/ and can be easily homemade in any sized container with a spun landscape fabric liner...

            And as a minimum you will still need to score the root ball to prevent root circling.
            You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
            Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

            Comment


            • #8
              Hi Pete, thanks for the link showing a great air pruning pot liner that I never seen before. Attached is an images showing a basic air pruning pots that I am using for now.
              I spent the whole morning using a drill to make some holes near the bottom of each container for better drainage plus air pruning concept (I finished 16 pots this morning myself). However, I have two fig trees in pots that I like to ask you for advice if they are ok to make holes or not as one black mission is producing breba crops while the other young Italian Honey is growing from dormant
              Attached Files

              Comment


              • AscPete
                AscPete commented
                Editing a comment
                Bud break is an indication that the roots have started growing. Usually root growth starts at the tips of the older roots similar to the branches.

                You could remove the root balls from the drilling area before making the holes by placing the pot on the side, sliding the root ball out only a few inches, then drilling the holes, then putting the pot back in the upright position.

                IMO, one or two rows of holes on the bottom of the pot (drilled into the root ball) should not affect the plant growth unless all the roots are concentrated in that location. Good Luck.

              • pacifica
                pacifica commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks again Pete for your comments. I really appreciate.

            • #9
              If the spun landscape fabric liner really makes a healthier root ball then has anyone ever tried using it in cup rooting? We use clear plastic cups so we can observe root development so if you put four 1 inch strips of spun landscape fabric liner in the cup leaving about 1 inch gaps so you can still see root development. It should stop root circling. This may help when up potting which at this stage is a known problem. Just thinking...

              Comment


              • AscPete
                AscPete commented
                Editing a comment
                I've never tried the fabric in cups...

                Several forum members use aeration pots and fabric pots similar to small Smart Pots, https://smartpots.com/product/black-...ot-no-handles/ to grow out their cuttings. I've made small (~ 32 oz) homemade fabric pots from the spun landscape fabric, but when used with fast draining mixes it dries out rapidly resulting in increased watering frequency with increased chances of over watering.

                For the smaller cutting cups increasing the quantity of aeration holes (side holes) has been sufficient for air root pruning, but its a test that you could try.

              • Blackfoot12
                Blackfoot12 commented
                Editing a comment
                Hmmm. Maybe but I have a lot of side holes and it didn't stop root circling. Maybe the holes are just not in the right place. In the cups I use there is a ledge near the bottom they seem to really like to circle on top of. Col de Dame Blanc is the worst offender. That one should come with a warning label for root circling.

            • #10
              I bought an unknown fig tree from a person that we never met before (online) in last Oct and found the fig tree was leafless. He shown me the green fig (frozen) to try and was taste good. Anyway, please see the attached images to see if the buds are good to proof the tree will survive or not.
              Attached Files

              Comment


              • joann1536
                joann1536 commented
                Editing a comment
                Looks like it's alive to me. Maybe even little figs, too.

              • pacifica
                pacifica commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks Joann

            • #11
              It looks like it's dormant but alive.
              Bob C.
              Kansas City, MO Z6

              Comment


              • pacifica
                pacifica commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks Bob
            Working...
            X