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  • Good idea to put RBD in ground in sesttle area?

    I want to put a fig tree in the ground in my front yard flower bed for both ornamental and fruit purpose (see picture for the area). It is north facing but get fun sun, 8 hours plus. I want to keep it in a tree form, not growing huge, 4 to 5 feet tall at most. I am considering RDB, but I am worried that it may be too vigorous and doesn't take aggressive pruning well.

    So is it a good idea to plant the RBD in my situation?

    If not, what variety would you recommend? I also have malta black, mbvs, florea, LSU tiger, vbd, miss figgy, LDA to plant instead.

    Thank you for your advice!
    Renton, wa (near Seattle); zone 8b

  • #2
    Originally posted by Chen View Post
    I am considering RDB, but I am worried that it may be too vigorous and doesn't take aggressive pruning well.

    This variety has excellent tolerance for strong pruning. It is enough to leave only the base of the branches and you will have a harvest with minimal delay. I prune the trees heavily in the fall to make it easier for me to cover them with tarpaulin.






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    • #3
      Tree form and RdB don't go together. RdB likes to bush. I think if you are willing to keep the suckers trimmed, that you can maintain a single trunk. My RdB got up to about chin high on me and has since spread without getting any taller. My experience with Malta Black is that it is an excellent for single trunk tree form. It is one of those trees that continues to grow upward. Pruning on this variety will be to control height. The brebas are pretty good and it sets a good many for me, so that should make it more valuable in your area. It is also extremely prolific and early. The others, I don't know. I am sure that you will get some more advice.
      PPP
      Eatonton, GA zone 7b/8a

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      • jrdewhirst
        jrdewhirst commented
        Editing a comment
        RdB does like to form suckers (which makes it easy to clone) and it branches well. Both factors can encourage bushy growth, if the grower doesn't prune diligently. But if you remove both suckers and unwanted branches, you can readily produce a central leader tree. Growth habit is not a reason to avoid RdB in the ground.

    • #4
      I think ramv had a splitting problem last year with them in ground. Maybe would be issue
      Actively seeking any and all varieties
      #Sharing is caring
      Courtenay, BC 🇨🇦 zone 8a

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      • ramv
        ramv commented
        Editing a comment
        No splitting problem. In ground figs never split for me. Only potted ones do. My RDB is still in pots and deserve to be in ground. (As do another dozen varieties!)

      • BC BYRON
        BC BYRON commented
        Editing a comment
        I swore last year you where complaining about your RDB during the wet fall

      • ramv
        ramv commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes my potted RDB split horribly. Figs are better grown in ground.

    • #5
      RdB can be in tree form. I had one in SoCal but agree it may turn into a bush in your area.
      Moved from 10b to 7a

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      • #6
        I think any of Malta Black, RDB or lda will do great in ground in Seattle.

        RDB is earliest, Malta black is next and lda will ripen only in late Sep onwards. But lda has the sweetest best tasting figs even in miserable cold fall weather.

        Comment


        • Netstars
          Netstars commented
          Editing a comment
          I planted Malta Black in ground last fall.
          LDA is definitely going in ground when it get bigger.

      • #7
        Thank you Ram! Are malta black and LDA easy to control it's size, pretty prune tolerate? Do you keep them in a certain size or let them grow big naturally? What other variety would you recommend in ground that will ripe?

        Renton, wa (near Seattle); zone 8b

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        • ramv
          ramv commented
          Editing a comment
          Yes. Very easy. These grow much slower than Desert King.

          The ones on your list are some of the more reliable ones for main crop.

      • #8
        I am in Seattle and I have two RDBs in-ground. They have grown vigorously and the three year old plant produced about 30 ripe figs for me during our cold, wet summer of 2019. Good choice

        K2

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        • Netstars
          Netstars commented
          Editing a comment
          Do you have your trees in full sun?

        • TahomaGuy2
          TahomaGuy2 commented
          Editing a comment
          My potted RdB was the ONLY variety that didn't lose any fruit last year due to the horrible weather that affected us here in Oregon, too!

      • #9
        If you dont want to prune much i recommend Little miss figgy in ground it is more dwarfing inhabit.
        Please subscribe to my youtube channel all about figs and fruit trees thank you! https://www.youtube.com/c/kimtien

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        • #10
          Click image for larger version

Name:	A3A6A9BA-DD8E-45B0-823F-D1EB88213AA7.jpeg
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ID:	740391 Hey Kim, I just saw Little miss figgy at flower world. They said it only grows 4-6 feet tall.
          but the tree on sale was 8 feet high!
          ​ ​​​​​​​

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          • Enscribe
            Enscribe commented
            Editing a comment
            Now that's funny. Most plant tags are wrong about full size. Last season, my two LMF grew more vigorously than some other varieties that are not known to be dwarfing. I think the fruit size describes what is small about LMF.

          • JonW
            JonW commented
            Editing a comment
            I bought a Little Miss Figgy from Flower World a couple weeks ago.

        • #11
          When I purchased my RDB from Vasile, he told me that it does best in a location that gets partial sun.
          I am actually finally putting the tree in ground tomorrow.
          I have all my in ground fig trees in full sunlight.
          I am going to place my RDB in partial sunlight per Vasile.
          This man really knows figs and I trust his judgment.
          Zone 8B - Cottage Grove, Or
          Wish List - Raspberry Tart to be common!

          Comment


          • Sod
            Sod commented
            Editing a comment
            Is it morning or afternoon sun? That’s pretty encouraging. I’ve got one side of my yard that’s shaded by fir trees until about 11 am that I’ve been trying to figure out what to grow there. I’ve heard Malta black does decent in partial shade too.

          • ramv
            ramv commented
            Editing a comment
            I had one of my RdB under the shade of a large tree, not full shade but about 6 hours of sun. The fruit was delayed by quite a bit compared with other trees that were in full sun. I have a total of 6 RDB trees that I move around.
            But the sun is weak in Seattle, even in Summer so maybe that makes a difference.

          • Netstars
            Netstars commented
            Editing a comment
            ramv I know that Doug has had a difficult time with RDB in Oroville. Not sure where I am going to plant mine now.
            Maybe in full sun and just see what happens?

        • #12
          Originally posted by Netstars View Post
          When I purchased my RDB from Vasile, he told me that it does best in a location that gets partial sun.
          In my family, this variety of figs has been grown for over 60 years. Trees of this variety do not tolerate shading and do not tolerate drought. They need a lot of sun and lots of water. The tree will grow well if shaded, but it will not produce a good harvest.

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          • Netstars
            Netstars commented
            Editing a comment
            Great information - thanks!

        • #13
          I do agree that RDB have very beautiful leaves, you can pruning them to control its size, your area have 2200 GDD, Our soils are more wet side than dry, If your soils are very wet, it will grow very fast and fruits late, at drier soils, It will grow slower and fruit early.

          If you do not want to take any risk of fail, you may plant Desert king or Italian honey, They will give you a good crop of figs in 1 or 2 years.
          Surrey BC canada

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          • TahomaGuy2
            TahomaGuy2 commented
            Editing a comment
            YES! Those would be my #1 and #2 choices as well. Both have met the test of time here in our cool, maritime summer climate of western Oregon or WA State.

        • #14
          Originally posted by Rickyv101 View Post
          If your soils are very wet, it will grow very fast and fruits late, at drier soils, It will grow slower and fruit early.
          From my personal observations, the opposite happens. The fruits ripen early when there is a lot of moisture during their formation. When the soil is dry, their development slows down. The size of the fruit is small and the number is insignificant compared to the tree being watered.

          Click image for larger version

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ID:	740572

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          • Rickyv101
            Rickyv101 commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks for your info, I live beside river, soils are very wet, our area has very short growing season and heat at 1700 GDD, RDB seems like wet soils with fast vegetable growing and fruit later (may be weak sun). I will need few more years to try them.
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