X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Grafting Assistance

    I know there's a million grafting threads, but I really could use a little more personalized help. It was my first time grafting tonight, and I don't think I did that great of a job. Went with the whip and tongue graft. Sealed the graft with carpenters glue, but the glue looked like it may have filled the small spaces in between the graft union. I fear that may be stopping cambium from touching cambium. Do you guys think that'll be a problem? Wrapped the whole thing tightly with parafilm.

    Can I put my mind at ease or should I clean up the glue and start over?
    I know wax is common, but what do you seal your grafts with? Anything I can pick up at Home Depot?
    And most importantly any general tips or things to watch out for? It's one of those things that looks easy (I even practiced a little), but I feel like you really need to pay attention to the small details.

    Thanks for any help.

    -Ross
    Zone 7A - Philadelphia
    Flavor Profiles & Variety List / Facebook / YouTube / Blog

  • #2
    Maybe Hershell or HarveyC can weigh in here, they are the experts.

    I tried grafting figs last year and it was a miserable failure. I might try again this year.

    Good Luck.
    Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

    Comment


    • #3
      In my openion throw the glue out. We do the graft and wrap the union with 1" grafting tape ( white flag tape) the scion does have wax gulf wax on top. Parafilm is great to wrap it with above the union. You can put a zip lock freezer bag over the graft and dip it tight for extra protection.
      Nothing in the world takes the place of growing citrus till figs come along. Ray City, Ga. Zone 8 b.

      Comment


      • ross
        ross commented
        Editing a comment
        Will this work? http://www.homedepot.com/p/Empire-1-...-062/100200329

        And the reason why I thought I needed to seal it was because parafilm is breathable, so air will pass through. I'm assuming the flag tape will prevent airflow?

      • ross
        ross commented
        Editing a comment
        Also, I'm gonna take the glue off. Do you think I should start with fresh cuts as well?

    • #4
      Just think, doing this many we don't have time for glue or other sealers but have tried them. We just graft and keep going. Usually we get just under 80 percent average.
      You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
      Nothing in the world takes the place of growing citrus till figs come along. Ray City, Ga. Zone 8 b.

      Comment


      • #5
        You can pick up a wax seal in the plumbing section to seal the graft. Elmer's glue is great for sealing cut ends, but I fear you're correct and that it will prevent a graft from forming given how you used it.
        Fig & Blackberry Farmer in Sunol, CA.

        Comment


      • #6
        Parafilm works wonders. No need for glue.
        Zone 8B Willamette Valley, Oregon

        Wishlist: , Planera, Del sen juam gran, NSDC, De la Gloria, Greco Nero.

        Comment


        • #7
          I tried a couple grafts last year with no luck, this time I will try with parafilm. So after I wrap with parafilm do I need to put anything else over the graft before I cover it for shade?
          Ryan- CenLa, zone 8a/b

          Comment


          • #8
            If you already have Parafilm, the only other thing you need is a knife and rubber band. No need for any wax, etc. You should start over, IMO. Pull scion into contact with rootstock with rubber band.

            Using the white PVC grafting tape like Hershell does is fine also but you may need to come along later and cut it. Parafilm and rubber bands just break down in sunlight, no follow-up action required.

            I'll try to do a video for fig grafting one of these days. Here is one I did a few years ago for grafting white sapote. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pfk3W0xxQRE
            My fig photos <> My fig cuttings (starts late January) <> My Youtube Videos

            Comment


            • #9
              Last month I posted some fig grafting photos at https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics/...13808022012944
              My fig photos <> My fig cuttings (starts late January) <> My Youtube Videos

              Comment


              • fitzski
                fitzski commented
                Editing a comment
                thanks for sharing the video and pictures of grafting.

                You make it look so easy that I'm going to try again

              • SmyFigs
                SmyFigs commented
                Editing a comment
                Harvey, nice pictures and descriptions on grafting on your FB page!

            • #10
              Yea, what Harvey said. Just keep it simple and do it. Practice makes you better at getting scion and stock to fit but it's not that critical.
              Nothing in the world takes the place of growing citrus till figs come along. Ray City, Ga. Zone 8 b.

              Comment


              • #11
                As far as grafting figs which graft fits into the aesthetically pleasing category? Isn't that what you want? Say instead of a veneer graft?

                Comment


                • #12
                  Well, I regrafted tonight using a different method with no wax, no glue... just parafilm, and I feel much better about it. It looks much cleaner.

                  I do have two questions though... what's a good indication that the graft was successful/unsuccessful?
                  How long do figs take on average & does temperature have anything to do with it?
                  Zone 7A - Philadelphia
                  Flavor Profiles & Variety List / Facebook / YouTube / Blog

                  Comment


                  • HarveyC
                    HarveyC commented
                    Editing a comment
                    My plants are in my grow room at about 75F and I start to see growth usually in 1-2 weeks.

                    I'ts pretty difficult to pull a scion into contact with the rootstock very securely with Parafilm only. If you didn't use a rubber band, you could still take time to do it now.

                  • ross
                    ross commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Opps! I forgot to mention the rubber band. It's on there, and I definitely saw it's value. Thanks for the tip, Harvey.

                    And my question about temperature actually relates to your post here, Harvey: http://www.cloudforest.com/cafe/gard...raft-t871.html

                    Which makes me wonder if figs are similar to chestnuts. Maybe I should move my graft somewhere warmer, but with less light? The night temps in the greenhouse are not ideal. Above 32 F though..

                • #13
                  Thanks for everyone's help thus far!
                  Zone 7A - Philadelphia
                  Flavor Profiles & Variety List / Facebook / YouTube / Blog

                  Comment


                  • #14
                    See this post I made on F4F, especially comment #19. Might be useful to you: http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox....ng-fun-7892376
                    Location: USDA Zone 9b / Sunset 13. Chandler, AZ

                    Comment


                    • #15
                      Ross,

                      I'm a grafting novice, but here's an interesting article about readily available products that can be used for grafting, http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/...5/579.full.pdf The scion and tape edges could then be sealed with "Toilet Bowl Seal" wax, http://www.ksl.com/?nid=359&sid=19193486 and http://2footalligator.blogspot.com/2...xperience.html

                      I'm planning on trying several fig grafts this spring.
                      Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

                      Comment


                      • ross
                        ross commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Pete,

                        Have you found any convincing evidence as to whether or not temperature has an affect on the success of the graft union?

                      • AscPete
                        AscPete commented
                        Editing a comment
                        The grafting temperatures have to be the same as the actual growing temperatures since cell growth forms the calluses (at the cambium layer) its the same as the optimal temperatures for growing cuttings ~ 75 deg F.

                    • #16
                      New article posted yesterday in our "Articles" section complements of HarveyC. Photos forwarded by Andreas-Patars.
                      Wish List: πŸ™πŸΌ Mavra Sika

                      Comment


                      • HarveyC
                        HarveyC commented
                        Editing a comment
                        note - those are my photos. I was grafting late the other night and just found it easier to send to Andreas via FB PMs (via my phone) instead of trying to do so here via ourfigs PMs and asked him to forward to you.

                      • WillsC
                        WillsC commented
                        Editing a comment
                        I will make the change to it Harvey.

                    • #17
                      This was my first year grafting too, and I use Parafilm first around the union and the surrounding inch or two, then covering it with electrical tape for protection.

                      I've been using Parafilm M around all my grafts and it works very well in getting a clean join and provides enough rigidity for stable support. Since Parafilm is light-sensitive and seems to crumble and weaken pretty quickly after prolonged exposure to sunlight, I also wind black electrical tape around the graft to protect the Parafilm. I've been doing it this way on all grafts (no electrical tape over bud grafts) and so far the Asian pear, apple, and plum grafts have been 100% successful other than one I knocked off by accident. Fig grafts have been slower to show signs of life despite some fig trees waking up otherwise, but so far only one is definitely dried up after 4-6 weeks for some. The rest (~15-20 grafts) are still fully hydrated and there are a few just now showing green buds swelling. It started the earliest on a Genovese Nero graft, which was pretty exciting for me as my attempt to root the rest of that cutting had failed.
                      Sarah
                      Bay Area, CA (zone: 9B)

                      Comment


                      • #18
                        Last year I did some test grafts with Hershells help via phone for questions. Having never grafted before I still got 60% so go for it, is not that difficult. This year I was smarter about it and I had what I consider 40 "you better not kill all of them when rooting varieties" I started two cuttings of each in the rooting and while 30 varieties did great on 10 varieties the 2 cuttings both failed or look very iffy. That one saved cutting in the cooler of each variety is the difference (or may be) between not having that variety or having it. Yesterday I started grafting those to my VDB's and each cutting is yielding 3-4 grafts so I hope to end up not losing any of the 10 that did not want to root, we shall see. If they grow I will then airlayer them off the rootstock and plant them.
                        Cutting sales at willsfigs.com will continue till about March 1.

                        Comment


                        • #19
                          Can a virus such as FMV be transferred from rootstock to sicon ?
                          Zone 5 Chicago IL Wish list:
                          1) Rest peacfully Amico Bello Buddy πŸ‘ΌπŸΌ.
                          2) This weeks ebay auctions.

                          Comment


                        • #20
                          I decided to practice on cuttings I took a couple weeks ago.

                          What is the best product for removing the sticky sap from the knife blade? After one or two cuts the blade becomes dificult to slice smoothly.

                          Also, how deep below the node should the cut be made?

                          You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
                          Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

                          Comment


                          • AscPete
                            AscPete commented
                            Editing a comment
                            I've used Mineral Spirits, Mineral Oil or Acetone to remove sap, then wiped clean / sterilized with Alcohol.
                            I've no experience with dormant chip budding, I will be experimenting in a few days.

                            I may instead be using this Chip-Bud Graft, http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=6763824 for dormant cuttings then planting the entire stock below soil line, with a stake to support the scion buds that grow out.
                        Working...
                        X