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  • Planting space dilemma

    Ok gang, I've planted 16 of my favorite varieties of Figs in my designated space and only have room for 4 more plants to go in the ground. Which 4 plants do you guys think should be chosen of the below 16?
    Vasilika sika
    Melanzana
    St Rita
    LSU Tiger
    Kadota
    Danny Delight
    Slidell Blk
    Osborn prolific
    Grosse monstrueuse
    Early violet
    Olympian
    Barnisotte
    O'Rourke
    LSU Hollier
    NJ Red
    Hunt

    Opinions appreciated. Even if it's from the peanut gallery.
    Randall - Gulf Breeze, FL. zone 8b. Wish list: Anything that "newnandawg" - Mike, ranks as an 8 out 10 or higher.

  • #2
    Buy bunch 55gal drums. Cut half and plant them all๐Ÿ˜œ
    Zone 5 Chicago IL Wish list:
    1) Rest peacfully Amico Bello Buddy ๐Ÿ‘ผ๐Ÿผ.
    2) This weeks ebay auctions.

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    • #3
      I would pick based on which are the best tasting for you and on which don't split in your locale, and which are most productive based on your growing experience in pots. If you have 16 in the ground already, may be wait a year or so and gain some personal preferences to pick the inground additions?
      Ed
      SW PA zone 6a

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      • #4
        What do you already have in ground? Might be good to split up the flavor groups and plant ones that are different.

        I've heard good things about St Rita, Hollier, Danny's Delight (at least for colder zones), Vasilika sika, and Melanzana.

        I like the barrel idea and waiting to see which ones you like too.
        Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

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        • #5
          Of the ones I have tasted these are all good figs
          St Rita
          LSU Hollier
          I don't grow Melanzana, but if this is the one they state is same as Longue D'Aout good choice
          Keeping one space open

          Phil North Georgia Zone 7 Looking for: All of them, and on and on,

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          • #6
            maybe time to start a frank'n fig. I have an LSU Purple, maybe I'll ad the LSU varieties to that one.
            Randall - Gulf Breeze, FL. zone 8b. Wish list: Anything that "newnandawg" - Mike, ranks as an 8 out 10 or higher.

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            • #7
              Have you tried the "three in a hole" planting scheme? In reality, they're planted in a triangle shape around 18 inches apart with two on the north side and one on the south side point. It takes a lot of shaping to keep them from crowding each other out, but there's space for three times as many trees in the ground and eventually they fill out in their assigned space. The ones you especially like, you can prune to give them more space. I keep most of my trees of a height so I can harvest without ladders anyway. I have a number of citrus, plums and apricots in a four to a box planting but figs are so sun hungry, it seems the three planting would work better for them than the four planting. The "A+" premium figs still rate their own individual space, but the "B" and "C" quality figs that you might want to eat less of should work well in the 3x planting.
              I haven't tasted Vasilika sika (Belleclare) but from what I've read, I've planted it solo. I might add one or two more trees to the space depending on how it tastes. LSU Hollier was also good enough last year to earn its individual yard space.
              People ask me how I can pack so many fruiting trees into a double lot suburban yard. That's how I do it.
              Mara, Southern California,
              Climate Zone: 1990=9b 2012= 10a 2020=?

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              • #8
                Sounds like it's time to move to a place with a bigger yard

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                • #9
                  Randall, from my experience in my area I would plant the St. Rita, Hollier, Tiger and leave a space for something more special. O Rourke is a good fig but I wouldnt plant it in ground.
                  newnandawg 7b Newnan, GA

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Altadena Mara View Post
                    Have you tried the "three in a hole" planting scheme? In reality, they're planted in a triangle shape around 18 inches apart with two on the north side and one on the south side point. It takes a lot of shaping to keep them from crowding each other out, but there's space for three times as many trees in the ground and eventually they fill out in their assigned space. The ones you especially like, you can prune to give them more space. I keep most of my trees of a height so I can harvest without ladders anyway. I have a number of citrus, plums and apricots in a four to a box planting but figs are so sun hungry, it seems the three planting would work better for them than the four planting. The "A+" premium figs still rate their own individual space, but the "B" and "C" quality figs that you might want to eat less of should work well in the 3x planting.
                    I haven't tasted Vasilika sika (Belleclare) but from what I've read, I've planted it solo. I might add one or two more trees to the space depending on how it tastes. LSU Hollier was also good enough last year to earn its individual yard space.
                    People ask me how I can pack so many fruiting trees into a double lot suburban yard. That's how I do it.
                    Have you done this high density planting with figs? I'm interested in it, but it seems like those big fig leafs would block too much sun from the other plants.
                    Houston, TX Zone 9a

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                    • Altadena Mara
                      Altadena Mara commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I planted four groups of figs, three to a group, a few weeks ago. It will be interesting to see how they grow together.

                      These are the fig tree recommendations for multiple plantings made by Tom Spellman at Dave Wilson nursery. Perhaps the big leaves were why he suggested three to a group for figs and four to a group for the other trees:
                      "Figs: Black Mission, Janice Seed-less Kadota and Panache โ€” These three figs planted together will give you a purple, a variegated and a yellow-green fruit with a prolonged harvest from July to first frost."
                      http://www.davewilson.com/home-garde...tiple-planting

                      Some people on the fig boards have discussed planting fig trees together and wrapping the trunks around each other into one trunk as they grow. That sounds like a lot of work.

                    • Visceral
                      Visceral commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I agree. Wrapping the trees may look neat, but that's too much effort for me. As for the high density planting, hopefully you can make some updates on the progress. I'm willing to try anything to save some space. I'd imagine planting figs with similar growing rates would keep one from taking over.
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