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  • Successful Grafting of Fig Trees and Cuttings

    Ficus Carica is extremely easy to propagate by stem cuttings so grafting was not regularly practiced commercially. Grafting has been used to "Top Work" or quickly change fig cultivars to a more marketable variety in established fig orchards by using the existing in-ground fig tree rootstocks, The documented successful commercial graft types for top working established fig trees are Cleft and Chip-Bud Grafts for dormant Rootstock / Scion, Bark and T-Bud Grafts for actively growing fig trees.

    Published photos and directions for Fig Cleft and Bud Grafts.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	Fig Cleft Graft USA.jpg Views:	1 Size:	93.1 KB ID:	74932Click image for larger version  Name:	fig bud graft usa.png Views:	1 Size:	308.6 KB ID:	74933

    Published document on Commercial Fruit Tree Grafting, (1).
    Click image for larger version  Name:	Fig Chip-Bud Graft.jpg Views:	1 Size:	204.1 KB ID:	74931Click image for larger version  Name:	Fig T-Bud Graft.jpg Views:	2 Size:	118.0 KB ID:	74930Click image for larger version  Name:	Fig Bark Graft.jpg Views:	1 Size:	109.0 KB ID:	74929

    Recently hobbyists, researchers and commercial ventures have been successfully grafting smaller caliper dormant cuttings to both rooted and unrooted fig root stock using modified Cleft, whip and Tongue, Saddle and Chip-Bud grafts. They have also successfully used Omega Type Grafting Tools to Saddle Graft fig scions. I originally trialed Saddle Grafts made with a grafting knife because they were the easiest type to get a tight fit between rootstock and scion with the least amount of practice. The grafted plants were eventually unsuccessful due to desiccation of the scion but half of the grafted unions were partially callused together even without the use of Grafting Sealant or Parafilm, (2). The objective of the different graft types is to get the most Cambium contact between the Fig Scion and Rootstock which will leads to fastest callusing, cellular differentiation and establishment of the new vascular system.

    Fig Cleft Graft: Larger Caliper Rootstock, (4)
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...xperts-6804225
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...-video-6209038
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...te-117-6861728

    Fig Chip-Bud Graft : Large to similar sized caliper Rootstock, (5)
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...utting-6763824
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...afting-6052305
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...afting-4743760
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...-graft-6185514
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...greece-6273097
    http://www.jardin-mundani.com/France...-majorquin.htm
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...f-figs-2766104

    Fig Bark Graft: Large Caliper Rootstock, smaller caliper Scion, (4)
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...-graft-6364290

    Fig T-Bud: Large to similar sized caliper Rootstock, (5)
    http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...mirnya-6052275

    Fig Saddle graft / Omega Grafting Tool: Similar sized caliper Rootstock and Scion, (6)
    Before... https://translate.google.com/transla...ml&prev=search
    After ... https://translate.google.com/transla...ml&prev=search
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKUbjcw7W1s


    @HarveyC,(7)
    I've found figs to be quite easy to graft and I have gotten to the point that I don't worry too much about getting alignment of cambium layers perfect, etc.
    Some guidelines that I suggest:
    1. Graft with dormant scions and rootstock with moderate growth rate (high growth may result in heavy sap flow the interferes with cambium contact)

    2. I almost always make partial circular cuts/scores around rootstock an inch or two below the planned grafting location to relieve pressure of sap flow. If I see almost no sap flow when I cut off the top of rootstock, I may skip this step.

    3. If scion and rootstock are about the same diameter, use a whip and tongue graft. If scion is slightly smaller than rootstock, just make cut in rootstock so that width between two sides of cambium are the same as the scion.

    4. If scion is maybe 3/4 or less than the diameter of the rootstock, use cleft graft. When using cleft graft I prefer scion to not be more than 1/2 the diameter of the rootstock (less splitting of rootstock), so consider going lower on rootstock to get thicker area.

    5. Conserve scionwood for expensive or precious varieties, using only 1 or 2 buds is fine.

    6. I prefer wrapping scion with Parafilm prior to placing the scion so that I'm not moving it around after it's already in place. Stretch the Parafilm a lot when placing over scion (and union area also, but less important) as this creates a better seal and makes it easier for buds to push through.

    7. I know some people put Parafilm on over union before placing rubber band but I always place rubber band on first and then cover union area with Parafilm. This results in less chance of scion moving and the Parafilm can also help keep the rubber band held in place a little bit better.

    8. Ask
    Hershell
    Veteran
    Hershell for further advice, he is a pro!

    I've bought various gadgets for grafting and yesterday did more grafting and resorted to my old Tina grafting knife, my favorite. I have 3 of them so I always have one that is very sharp. My eyesight is getting more difficult even with glasses (reflections, etc.) and I often use a magnifying lens (I have one that is worn as a hood on my head) to help align cambium layers. Practice a lot with cheap stuff!

    I've bought various gadgets for grafting and yesterday did more grafting and resorted to my old Tina grafting knife, my favorite. I have 3 of them so I always have one that is very sharp. My eyesight is getting more difficult even with glasses (reflections, etc.) and I often use a magnifying lens (I have one that is worn as a hood on my head) to help align cambium layers.

    Practice a lot with cheap stuff!
    Axier, (8, )
    1. Lately I have gotten good results with chip-buds from cuttings stored in the fridge. It is important to choose chip with well-formed buds and graft on a hardened green branch of the year.

    2. Older wood is worse to graft on, although it is also possible.

    3. It is enough to keep the aluminum foil for 5 to 7 days, no more. Probably 5 days is better than 7. Keep direct sun off of the graft during the first 5 or 6 weeks!

    4. I don't remove the graft covering strip before the 5th week. Don't be in a hurry to do it, except for a very early vigorous sprouting of the bud (unlikely).

    This Season I will be trialing an Omega Type Grafting tool, Bud, Bark and Saddle grafts made with grafting knifes and also Hormone application at the graft unions. My material list consists of Vinyl Electrical Tape, Poly Grafting Tape, Parafilm (9), 1/4" Rubber bands, Sealing Wax, Grafting Tool (6), Vinyl Grafting/gardening Tape,Assorted Grafting knives and Rooting Hormone, Dip N Grow (10)

    Please share your experiences Grafting Figs.


    References:
    1. http://www.caib.es/sacmicrofront/arc...94415&id=94415
    2. http://figs4funforum.arghchive.com/p...ttings-6310559
    3. http://www.nt.gov.au/d/Content/File/...Bull/TB194.pdf
    4. https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/hort/info/fruit/graft/graft.htm
    5. https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/hort/info/fruit/graft/bud.htm
    6. http://www.zenportindustries.com/upl...e/P00880_1.pdf
    7. http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...n-and-grafting
    8. http://www.infojardin.com/foro/showp...66&postcount=1
    9. http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/...5/579.full.pdf
    10. http://www.rooting-hormones.com/cummins.htm
    AscPete
    Fig Phenom
    Last edited by AscPete; 03-02-2018, 12:14 PM. Reason: fixed broken links to F4F forum topics...
    Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

  • #2
    testing...
    SoCal, zone 10.
    www.ourfigs.com Invite your friends.

    Comment


  • #3
    That's weird....I don't recall seeing this one until after the second post...
    Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Verdolino, Black Celeste, Rubado, Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra

    Comment


    • AscPete
      AscPete
      Fig Phenom
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      It was lost, hidden in virtual space until Gina found it and moved it back to the Fig Forum, Really!

  • #4
    Testing, also. I just finished four. Keeping fingers crossed.
    Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

    Comment


  • #5
    This is perfect! Pete were you reading my mind?? πŸ˜‰πŸ‘ I have really been wanting to learn how to graft but I'm really a very visual/kinesthetic type learner.. So unless I see a video that is really close up, I feel like Im missing something.. Would someone be able to tell me which grafting method (for figs) is the easiest for a first timer? I want to set my focus on just one type, otherwise my ADD kicks in and I get all kinds of scatterbrained.. Lol its terrible! So I'd be working with dormant rootstock.. And my choices run from small caliper (thinner than pencil) right up to med/thick caliper (about 3 pencils together), scion wood also dormant and ranges equally although I may not have any "exact matches" I have a grafting tool, victornix (sp?), grafting knife, grafting wax, and parafilm on hand, and Im pretty sure I could procure a few rubber bands as well.. Any suggestions? This could easily be my next obsession if I get the hang of it!

    Updated: I do also have some potential rootstock that is actively growing as well.. Not sure if that would make a difference or apply to a simpler grafting method to try for a first time.. Thanks a bunch for any advice
    Jamie0507
    Moderator
    Last edited by Jamie0507; 03-08-2016, 09:41 PM. Reason: Forgot something
    My Plant Inventory: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...HZcBjcsxMwQ7iY

    Cuttings Available 2022:
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...fxsT1DuH8/edit

    Comment


    • AscPete
      AscPete
      Fig Phenom
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      BTW, I'm using #64 rubber bands 1/4" wide that are inexpensive and readily available from office supply stores...

  • #6
    Jamie, if you need to practice cutting techniques I have lots of cuttings to spare. I practiced today on some of these cuttings and then used some to graft back on to the mother tree. The practice session helped to break the ice. The grafting was easy. Now it just the waiting to see if they take.
    Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507
      Moderator
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Jerry that is so nice of you to offer I do have quite a few Celeste/BT cuttings to practice on though before I move on to the more expensive ones, but I REALLY appreciate that I wish you lots of luck with the practice session you just did.. Keep us posted on your results!

  • #7
    Jamie,
    The Bark grafts and T-buds are typically used for actively growing rootstocks since they need to "slip" the scion under the bark.

    I found that the saddle graft was the easiest to make in my 1st ventures into fig grafting, HarveyC recommends the whip and tongue which I find needs lots of practice to hold the knife just right... It also needs a true grafting knife with a chisel point blade (sharpened only on one side) to get the "Flat" tapered cuts but I was never able to get good straight cuts with fig cuttings, more practice is needed.

    There are lots of videos on grafting using whip and tongue, but this video shows an actual knife positioning (right handed) that's easy to replicate, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCaRqvoL6Lc

    I've been testing my new Omega Type Grafting tool, http://www.ebay.com/itm/Black-Profes...3D141923140907 and its producing very good saddle grafts, much better that I could ever make with a knife. The grafting video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKUbjcw7W1s shows how the tool is used to produce the "Saddle" in the scion and the "Tongue" in the stock, its as easy as it looks in the video...

    As mentioned I plan to use this Chip-Bud method, http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=6763824 for dormant grafting of different sized stock and scion. The Victorinox Grafting knives are available online and are often sold as Florist or Garden Knives, http://www.homedepot.com/p/Victorino...9050/202101458 , http://www.ebay.com/itm/Victorinox-S...3D371567503123
    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
    AscPete
    Fig Phenom
    Last edited by AscPete; 03-09-2016, 01:03 AM. Reason: added links
    Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

    Comment


    • Jamie0507
      Jamie0507
      Moderator
      Jamie0507 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you Pete that was EXACTLY the guidance I was looking for.. With so many different methods of grafting, it's been difficult for me to find a couple to set my focus on learning about. Thanks a whole bunch!

    • AscPete
      AscPete
      Fig Phenom
      AscPete commented
      Editing a comment
      Jamie,
      You're welcome.

      Searching the web for info on the best graft type is a reason why this topic was started. Commercial Fig grafting is limited to Cleft,Bark and Bud grafts, but hobbyists are trying many different graft types, some are easy while others are difficult, I'm looking to learn the successful easy methods.

  • #8
    In an earlier grafting topic, http://www.ourfigs.com/forum/figs-ho...ing-assistance

    HarveyC
    Veteran
    HarveyC shared a link to his Facebook Pages, https://www.facebook.com/Figaholics/...13808022012944 Which has the following sequence of photos with descriptions of each step, which clearly shows his rootstock sap bleeding and his whip and tongue graft (in photo #5), it could be called a modified Whip & Tongue - Bud Graft.

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    And a Cleft Graft as described in his quote in the OP...

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    AscPete
    Fig Phenom
    Last edited by AscPete; 03-10-2016, 11:37 PM.
    Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

    Comment


    • #9
      I will post an update on some of my fig grafts tomorrow. Just posting now to remind myself to take some pics
      Location: USDA Zone 9b / Sunset 13. Chandler, AZ

      Comment


      • #10
        My approach to grafting figs, I have a good write up here on observations and approaches: http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox....ng-fun-7892376 see post 19 in particular, which I will repost below

        So cleft grafting is done when your rootstock (doesn't have to be a trunk, could be a branch) and scion are the same diameter. In this case you cut / decapitate the rootstock and then on the face of the cut end, take your grafting knife down the center (so that looking at the cut end you will have two semi-circles) about 1" or so. This is the 'cleft' that you will be grafting into. Then on the scion, take your pruners and cut off the bottom 1/8" so that you are working with only fresh wood. Then slice off two angled pieces (each one on opposite sides) so that the back of the scion tapers down to a point. This cut is also ~1" long. This 'wedge' on the scion inserts into the 'cleft' on the rootstock. And this is where it is important for the scions to be the same diameter. Because you are making cambium contact between the rootstock and scion on all of these cut surfaces (you will be making cambium contact along 4 lines). If for some reason you misjudged the diameters but already make the cuts, then push the scion to one side of the rootstock so that you have cambium contact along two lines. Then wrap the joint with grafting tape (I like the green florist tape, slightly stretchy) to compress the rootstock flaps against the scion.

        NOTE: for best results make your cuts as straight / flat as possible. If your cuts are 'wavy', then there won't be good cambium contact and the graft won't heal).
        NOTE: wrap your scion with parafilm / buddy tape before hand to prevent desiccation while graft heals.
        NOTE: NEVER touch the exposed cambium with your bare hands. Skin oils are phytotoxic and will prevent graft healing. So make your cut and hold the scion somewhere above the cut surface when you place onto roostock.

        In cases where you don't have a diameter match (i.e. 2" dia rootstock and 1/4" dia scion), then you have to do a different approach. You could do a veneer graft. In this case you make a single cut on the scion (nice and flat and straight). Then you make a matching cut on the rootstock. You are trying to make it the same width as the cut on the scion. But here is the trick: The scion is a smaller diameter. So you make a deeper cut on the scion and you make a shallow cut on the rootstock to get the same width. Be mindful of this. If you do this right, then the exposed cambium on the rootsock and scion line up on both sides of the cut (contact along two lines). If it doesn't, then bias the scion onto the rootstock so that you have contact only along one line. Then wrap with grafting tape to hold scion in place on root stock.

        Another option for diameter mismatch is chip budding. And for figs, I like this much better than a veneer graft (veneer graft works better for mangoes and avocados). Because with your scion, there are likely 3+ fig buds and this gives you 3 chances for a grafting take, instead of just one. So cut your buds off the scion, leave a bit of bark all around the bud. If you are good at this you can pick up the bud without touching the cambium and postion it (takes lots of practice). But if you are trying it for the first time, wear some sterile latex gloves in case you touch the exposed cambium. Then make a cut on the roostock to match the bud shape. Hold the bud to the rootstock and wrap.
        The other advantage to this approach is that you could select a height on the trunk where you want your buds to take. Then chip bud semi-equally along the circumference (i.e. spaced roughly 120 deg apart). This way, if they all take, you will have a tree with the cultivar you want (you could remove anything above the grafts after the grafts take) that is now topworked with three future desired-cultivar scaffold branch locations.

        Another philosophy that I employ is that I will often do a graft (either a cleft graft onto a branch or at a minimum a chip bud) for the following reasons:
        1. I have only one scion/cutting and I want to make sure it takes. I find rooting (especially with weak growing cultivars like Black Maderia, Black Ischia, etc.) has a more arbitrary take rate than grafting. So even if I have a cutting with three buds, sometimes I will chip bud graft the bottom bud and root the rest of the cutting. That way I have a back up
        2. I want to have fruit more quickly for a particular cultivar. My older trees are a few years old and I figure it can put a lot of energy into the scion that is just grafted and I can get fruit earlier from that cultivar than I can via rooting

        I will post a bunch of pictures of some of my grafts in the post below
        Location: USDA Zone 9b / Sunset 13. Chandler, AZ

        Comment


        • #11
          See these photos for some of my grafts. I will put scion, rootstock and approx graft date in the notes
          You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 9 photos.
          Location: USDA Zone 9b / Sunset 13. Chandler, AZ

          Comment


        • #12
          Starch,

          Thanks for taking the time to share the info and photos...

          A reason for learning to graft figs is to create a few 3-in-1 and 4-in-1 potted trees of "Hardier Cultivars" that can be maintained in colder zones (where they have to be stored dormant for the winter). IMO, with judicious pruning and cultural practice they could be relatively productive and compact. The T-Bud graft seems very promising since it can be done after the trees have broken dormancy and are actively growing.

          Bud Graft... Apple
          AscPete
          Fig Phenom
          Last edited by AscPete; 03-14-2016, 01:53 PM. Reason: added video link
          Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

          Comment


          • #13
            Pete,

            Absolutely, glad to share!

            Originally posted by AscPete View Post
            A reason for learning to graft figs is to create a few 3-in-1 and 4-in-1 potted trees of "Hardier Cultivars" that can be maintained in colder zones (where they have to be stored dormant for the winter). IMO, with judicious pruning and cultural practice they could be relatively productive and compact. The T-Bud graft seems very promising since it can be done after the trees have broken dormancy and are actively growing.
            I agree. I am creating Frankenfigs as 'backups' but you could use the same process for intentional tree creation. In fact, this comment I made above:

            Another option for diameter mismatch is chip budding. And for figs, I like this much better than a veneer graft (veneer graft works better for mangoes and avocados). Because with your scion, there are likely 3+ fig buds and this gives you 3 chances for a grafting take, instead of just one. So cut your buds off the scion, leave a bit of bark all around the bud. If you are good at this you can pick up the bud without touching the cambium and postion it (takes lots of practice). But if you are trying it for the first time, wear some sterile latex gloves in case you touch the exposed cambium. Then make a cut on the roostock to match the bud shape. Hold the bud to the rootstock and wrap. The other advantage to this approach is that you could select a height on the trunk where you want your buds to take. Then chip bud semi-equally along the circumference (i.e. spaced roughly 120 deg apart). This way, if they all take, you will have a tree with the cultivar you want (you could remove anything above the grafts after the grafts take) that is now topworked with three future desired-cultivar scaffold branch locations.

            could easily be applied to multiple cultivars on one trunk instead of just one cultivar on one trunk.

            I made a 3-in-1 mango with this same exact approach (instead I did veneer grafting instead of chip budding because that works better for mangoes, but the principle is the same).
            Location: USDA Zone 9b / Sunset 13. Chandler, AZ

            Comment


            • #14
              I should add a word of caution about creating multi-cultivar grafted fig trees or "Frankenfigs" due to the possibility of increasing the Fig Mosaic Viral infections of the grafted trees.

              I've actually been anti fig tree grafting, other than single grafts to increase the vigor of of slow growing, sick or "highly desired" varieties by grafting to healthy vigorous rootstocks. Since grafting connects the vascular systems of different cultivars there is an increased possibility that the grafted fig trees will have a greater @@@@tail of viral infections making the tree sickly, less vigorous and less productive.

              My planned 3-in-1 and 4-in-1 fig trees will have healthier cultivars (Champagne, unknown BryantDark, Unknown NolaDark and LSU Improved Celeste, VdB TC, etc) as rootstock and scion for varying flavor and ripening times and hopefully will not suffer from any increased viral @@@@tail.
              Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

              Comment


              • #15
                I've done 20 or so grafts now. None have taken yet, but temps have not been that high in my sun room. Have my chances of success decreased from potential callusing in colder temps? Each graft also takes me a while. How long do I have before my recent cuts form callus before getting sealed?
                Zone 7A - Philadelphia
                Flavor Profiles & Variety List / Facebook / YouTube / Blog

                Comment


                • AscPete
                  AscPete
                  Fig Phenom
                  AscPete commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Callusing is required for grafts to be successful, many species will develop callus in cold temperatures, figs need warmth and moisture to develop callus.

                  The faster the graft is performed the better the results. If the scion and or stock are dormant the delay can be greater than if they were actively growing, but they should not be allowed to "dry out" in either case.

                • ross
                  ross
                  Fig Phenom
                  ross commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thanks for the info, Pete. You have put my mind at ease.

              • #16
                I think I may have to fire myself from grafting 😳.. I mutilated 3 perfectly good trees and countless celeste cuttings that I was "practicing" on.. These are heinous crimes I committed against these innocent trees all in the name of "franken figgin" I must stop myself! Lol! Seriously even the omega tool knock off, I cut the sticks wrong.. Had a 50/50 shot and kept getting it wrong.. Back to the drawing board for me!
                Jamie0507
                Moderator
                Last edited by Jamie0507; 03-21-2016, 08:44 PM. Reason: Darn spelling mistake!
                My Plant Inventory: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...HZcBjcsxMwQ7iY

                Cuttings Available 2022:
                https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...fxsT1DuH8/edit

                Comment


                • #17
                  Lmao. I'm reporting you to the fig police for fig mutilation.
                  Zone 7A - Philadelphia
                  Flavor Profiles & Variety List / Facebook / YouTube / Blog

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                  • Jamie0507
                    Jamie0507
                    Moderator
                    Jamie0507 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    You must turn me in Ross lol, I must be stopped from doing this to some other perfectly healthy fig tree in the future! Muah haha!! πŸ˜‰

                • #18
                  I did about 150 grafts 2 weeks ago, still waiting. Some of the buds are starting to swell so hoping
                  Cutting sales at willsfigs.com will continue till about March 1.

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    I'm going to try my first FIG graft this weekend if time allows, I've done a lot of grafts with very high success rates, I hope the fig in no different.
                    Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                    β€œThough the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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                    • #20
                      Great information on grafting...

                      Hope to try it one day...
                      My wish list is what ever come from my dear friend is the most special fig no matter what the vatiety is. I wish my dear friend to stay well always and always be happy. Jonathan

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                      • #21
                        Hey guys, i need guidance from the graft masters of the board, since we have the best here!

                        I mentioned to some people already, but i wound up abandoning my cloner cuttings since some were getting slime and no movement in 1 month. So i transferred them to bag method in humidity bin 4 weeks ago, and some of them have rooted and in cups now. While in the cloner they did have leaf growth that they since lost, but i still have green buds on all of them - so i'm assuming they are still alive. I have some harder/rarer to root varieties that were gifts that i really don't want to lose and was thinking about taking a shot at grafting them, hoping i can get 2 or 3 grafts out of each cutting. I plan on using some of my already rooted unknown varieties that i can live without as rootstock.

                        Would cleft graft work for this purpose even though i have green buds on the cutting, it seems like the easiest graft for a newbie like myself.

                        Thanks guys
                        You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.
                        May the Figs be with you!
                        ​​​​​

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                        • AscPete
                          AscPete
                          Fig Phenom
                          AscPete commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Matty,
                          To clarify...
                          Cleft grafts on actively growing rootstock can be used with your pictured cuttings, they are actually "dormant" since the buds are closed.

                          Cleft grafts on growing rootstock can be used at any time of the year with dormant or growing scion. Dormant rootstock can only be used with dormant scion...

                          The only exception as noted is using dormant rootstock with growing (green) scion.
                          Good Luck.

                        • BrooklynMatty
                          BrooklynMatty
                          Moderator
                          BrooklynMatty commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Pete - that is exactly what i was looking to confirm before moving forward. I think others would find that very helpful as well to know dormant vs non dormant pairings for grafting (possibly add that to the main post)

                          I just ordered a grafting knife and a diamond sharpening stone, hopefully will do some testing this weekend and possibly the actual grafts as well. I really want to save some of these beautiful varieties I will keep everyone posted of results.

                          Thanks for the guidance!

                        • starch
                          starch
                          Senior Member
                          starch commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I agree. With grafting in general (not just fig grafting) you want to look for buds on the scion wood that are swelling but still closed. If they are closed but not swelling then there is very little energy (plant carbohydrates) in that wood. If the bud has already broken then it has pushed too far and the growth of the new leaves will be interrupted when they are grafted and they will die. When the bud is swollen, there is a lot of energy in the wood and you don't have to worry about leaves dying.

                          So in figs the best buds for grafting are ones that are swollen and still brown. Once they are green they are too close to pushing. My $0.02

                      • #22
                        A question from someone who has never grafted, with apologies if I missed the answer above: Does anyone know from experience or reading how grafting of figs impacts the qualities of the fruit, including such factors as flavor, size, and timing? You'd think that grafting a variety onto a very vigorous rootstock would improve the flavor, and possibly increase the size. Maybe ripening time would be altered a bit too, pushed in the direction of the rootstock (e.g., would Paradiso's main crop become earlier when grafted onto Florea?). Maybe a variety that becomes water-logged in the rain would be OK if grafted onto a rain-tolerant root? And what about the qualities of the tree, such as cold hardiness? Does a tender variety benefit at all from being grafted onto a cold-hardy root?

                        I'm imagining that all of these characteristics are driven by genes, coding for hormones, growth factors, etc. What I don't know is which genes will drive which processes. For example, will earliness be driven by genes in the grafted scion or in the host rootstock.

                        Thx.
                        Joe, Z6B, RI.

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                        • AscPete
                          AscPete
                          Fig Phenom
                          AscPete commented
                          Editing a comment
                          There isn't any conclusive evidence that fig scion gains any characteristics of the rootstock other than vigor usually due to the established root mass. Since fig cultivars are easily replicated by cuttings the majority of fig grafts were done to top work tree in commercial orchards for quick profits (more profitable cultivars).

                          Having trees on their own roots ensures that the desired cultivar will regrow from winter die back, keeping in mind that Ficus carica is native to a temperate zone 9 -10... Hobbyists are currently grafting to quickly gain branches that can be air layered or used for cuttings to quickly replicate the more desirable and often poor growing cultivars.

                          Please keep us updated if you find any conclusive info, thanks.

                        • WillsC
                          WillsC
                          Admin / Owner
                          WillsC commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I have heard discussions that grafting on some varieties may actually make the taste of the fruit worse, that some way the severe stunting of say FMV on some varieties actually improves or intensifies the flavor but that is just all speculation as far as I know.....

                        • Bluemalibu
                          Bluemalibu
                          Moderator
                          Bluemalibu commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Wills, just as breweries and wineries use specific yeast strains to produce their desired libations, Harvey has isolated and perfected his desired FMV strain to provide a unique fruit from each cultivar. ;-)

                      • #23
                        There is an important grafting relationship between scion and rootstock that has to be followed, as mention in a prior post...

                        Live scion to live stock only.
                        Dormant scion to live or dormant stock.


                        Most of my planned grafts will be T-Bud to live root stocks once they've started growing. Attached are some photos of Omega Tool and whip and tongue grafts to dormant rootstock.

                        Some additional fig grafting webpages.
                        http://www.jardin-mundani.com/Englis...n-majorcan.htm
                        http://www.greffer.net/?p=7
                        You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.
                        Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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                        • #24
                          This link is to a 35 page booklet from the University of Florida that has been very helpful to me.
                          http://ifasbooks.ifas.ufl.edu/p-169-...n-florida.aspx
                          Jennings, Southwest Louisiana, Zone 9a

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                          • #25
                            Heres hoping they take. Thanks for the great advice everyone.Used Cleft Graft and turned 5 cuttings into 7 grafted plants. If i get 50% i would ecstatic!

                            Now its a waiting game to see if they actually take.


                            You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 4 photos.
                            May the Figs be with you!
                            ​​​​​

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