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  • Water method for cutting

    I have been using water method for hard wood cutting for the last few years and the success rate in general has been pretty good but takes time and need to be patience.
    My question is can I plant my 2 years old fig tree in ground where the drainage is not good. That's why I pot all my fig trees in containers as I am afraid they will be killed by overwater and rot etc. (the drainage of my back yard is awful during winter and raining reason) Since water cutting is workable to produce roots and leaves etc., what do you think to plant in ground where can be overwatered for a few months in a year.

  • #2
    Here is a fig tree that is thriving in a very wet spot. It depends on other factors too, just water alone does not mean bad, I think.
    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.
    USDA z 10a, SoCal. WL: Raspberry Tart, Boysenberry Blush

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    • pacifica
      pacifica commented
      Editing a comment
      I have seen this before. My back yard is not that bad honestly. In the past, I put 3 Japanese Maple trees there, but they all killed by too much water and rot in every 3 years. Fig tree might be OK, but not sure. Anyone can give me some informations ?

  • #3
    I've read where many people go with raised beds in poor drainage areas.
    Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

    “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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    • pacifica
      pacifica commented
      Editing a comment
      I did raise my back yard by 5" above, but never work for my 3 x Japanese Maple tress in the last some years. I am not sure if work for fig tree or not.

  • #4
    Why don't you try? Just plant something you are not afraid to loose and see what happens.
    USDA z 10a, SoCal. WL: Raspberry Tart, Boysenberry Blush

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    • pacifica
      pacifica commented
      Editing a comment
      I did try Japanese Maple before and three of them in different years were all killed.

    • greenfig
      greenfig commented
      Editing a comment
      Sorry, I meant the figs

  • #5
    Cogardener is right place them on a large mound or berm, it will ease the stress of soggy roots and allow the crown to remain dry. If you have space plant on an 18 inch to 2 foot raised mound. Its a lot of work to move the soil but your figs will love it.

    Ian
    Ian

    Really happy with what I have.

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    • #6
      Does it make sense if I still place the fig tree in pot on top of the garden soil (raised by 5 - 6" height) and cut out the base of the container so that the roots an grow like in ground ? I did ask some local nurseries for same and the answers are 50% and 50%.

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      • #7
        I hear that works almost as well as a sip so I'll be trying it with some (probably a lot) this year. Drilling 1" holes along the bottom side of the bucket and burying a couple of inches so the roots can grow out. I won't have any holes on the bottom because I want to be able to dig it up easily to store in the garage.

        I would think it would work well in your situation at least for a while. I don't know where you are but it would eventually just outgrow the pot if in a warm climate.
        Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

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        • pacifica
          pacifica commented
          Editing a comment
          Hi Don, I am located in Vancouver, B.C. Canada where our winter time is not too bad, very seldom to have snow. The coolest can be between - 1 to - 5.
          I did drill over 12 holes near the base of my large container but only 3/4" dia of each hole. Do I need to remove the base (a lot of work to do this by myself honestly) or simply put more garden soil outside till to cover all holes being drilled. (this should be a lot more easy to handle myself)

      • #8
        I would second the idea of using a raised bed. Stacking two or three used tires then burying the tires in a mound of dirt and compost will make an insulated mound that will drain quickly, but retain water in the tire "cheeks" for a SIP like irigation system, and help protect the roots from freezing in the winter.

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        • pacifica
          pacifica commented
          Editing a comment
          I like your idea and might work for my situation. Thanks a lots ThaiFigs Have you or other people tried that before ?

      • #9
        My back yard as poor drainage as well, I tried to plant my trees in the higher spots but I ran out of high spots as the back yard is beyond max capacity, lol. The only time I've ever seen an problems is in the summertime when my small trees have lots of fresh new growth and and the rains start, or even worse a big downpour happens then the sun comes out right after then some of my trees will look wilted. This past winter was a lot wetter then usual but it doesn't seem to bother my dormant trees because they are all budding out now. Now I'm just talking about what is going on in my yard and a lot of factors can differ from climate to climate. I'm sure you can't go wrong with a raised bed like others have mentioned here.
        Ryan- CenLa, zone 8a/b

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        • #10
          Thanks to all members for your great ideas and informations about my issue. I have decided to let my fig tree to continue siting in the pot since I have drilled over 12 holes near the bottom to see how it goes. I might use an used tires to follow as what ThaiFigs suggested above.

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          • #11
            Yes, the idea is actually a combination of two techniques each of which I've seen being used sucessfully here in Thailand.

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            • #12
              Hello ThaiFig, I am thinking to up pot some of your 1 year old young fig from 1 gal pot to 2 gal pot etc. Since I can not get any coconut coir here in Vancouver, B.C. Canada, can I use 50% Pro-Mix potting soil and mix with 50% Sunshine peak moss instead of 100% Pro-Mix potting soils as I did that for my 1 gal young fig last year ? If not any suggestion for the newbie like me. Should I add just a little chicken manure (composted) on the surface of the soil then cover by mini bark nuggets etc. Look forward to receiving your comments by return with thanks

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              • ThaiFigs
                ThaiFigs commented
                Editing a comment
                Promix is already blended so don't think mixing in peat moss would improve it. Chicken manure is very high in nitrogen because chicken manure is a mix of pee and poo, if you get my meaning . Unless you are just looking to grow a leafy tree for shade, a more balanced manure would be a better choice.

            • #13
              Have done well using potted figs and allow the roots to grow out from drilled holes. I have also grow fig trees on raised beds
              and they have done well.

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