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  • When do you throw in the towel with cuttings?

    This has been a great first year of rooting cuttings for me. I have 12 flourishing plants and about 15 cuttings on their way to leafing. The bag method didn't work for me at all... I'm sure I did something wrong and my house is crazy dry. In the end, a modified direct pot method worked best.

    That said, when do you ditch your cuttings and give up on them? I have over 30 that are still in cups and tented with sandwich bags. No visible roots, no budding, but they're also not yet shriveled up. Some have been in cups since December and I'm dying to have my dining room table back!
    Zone 7a in Virginia

  • #2
    If there's no mold or they are not rotted then they are not done yet. If you cut them and you still see green, they are still viable in my experience.

    Maybe move them outside on warm days. Maybe more direct or partial sunlight will help?

    I plan on moving some of mine to the unheated greenhouse in the next week or two so I can start some veggie seeds in the basement.
    Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

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    • #3
      I have a bunch just like that. This morning I removed these six sullen sad cuttings, removed the lower node and now have them hydrating in Dyna gro KLN and later today after an 8 hour bath they will be read their last rites dusted in root powder and direct potted into coir and perlite and placed on a heat mat in a humidity tank. They are still green, but after 8 weeks and no action its time to give them one last chance.

      Ian
      Ian

      Really happy with what I have.

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      • #4
        I wouldn't throw in the towel until there isn't any sign of life (green) around at least one node. I've had a cutting or two that I've ended up cutting down to one node because of mold/rot that ended up rooting.

        Others may disagree but I would say after 3 months that it is probably time to take them out, inspect them, cut away any rot/mold/dried sections, and try another method. I'd recommend soaking them in water for a day and using moist spaghnum moss to root them. Perhaps with some clonex.

        Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra, Rubado

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        • #5
          I have had this situation numerous times. I would outlook the cutting and soak in water for 24 hours. Try either paper towel method or put in bag with either coir or moss. Gotta switch it up.

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          • #6
            If my cuttings don't root in 5 weeks I get them out, and examine them. If they look ok I change the medium even if it's the same thing but fresh stuff. I look carefully at the mediun and the cutting to see what the problem might be. I re- scrape the cutting and reapply clonex. I might soak in KLN but it hasn't made a huge difference for me. If the cutting was at 82 degrees I'try 76. If it was 74 I'll try 82.

            I don't give up on a cutting until all the bark slips off. If there's a problem the sooner you fix it the better its chance of survival is. In my house if it hasn't rooted in 5 weeks there's something wrong with the cutting or its environment.
            Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

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            • #7
              Thanks everyone--these are all great suggestions! I'm going to go home and have a talk with them. I have plenty of bags and medium, so I'll give them one last shot.
              Zone 7a in Virginia

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              • #8
                Sarina,

                Not until they are completely dessicated or rotted.
                If the cuttings are not dried out or rotted they are still viable and may be rescued with an old heat treatment that's been discussed in the past...
                Click image for larger version

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                Its used hot tap water 120 - 130 deg F. (allowed to cool down to room temps with the cuttings) to hydrate the cuttings overnight. I've used a similar approach to rooting cuttings by hydrating the moss or coir with hot tap water just before rooting cuttings. The entire book is available here, https://archive.org/details/figitshistorycul00eise
                Good Luck
                Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

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                • #9
                  Depends how precious they are and how badly you want to recoup your space. As time goes on it becomes the law of diminishing returns. If they are precious and it has been more than 6 weeks then I like the idea of shaking things up - changing the temp, changing the media, getting them out in sun, etc.
                  Steve
                  D-i-c-k-e-r-s-o-n, MD; zone 7a
                  WL: Nantes Maroc

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                  • #10
                    Sarah, I recently wondered the same thing. I had quite a few cuttings that seemed to do nothing. But they were viable and I could see this except no roots. At least I thought no roots! I took all of them out this past weekend and found that they all had a nice ball of roots but they were not showing on the outside of my cups. These cuttings were some that had been through hell and back. I mean they were in moss first but they didnt do well but I rescued them. anyway, I was happily surprised!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by AscPete View Post
                      Sarina,

                      Not until they are completely dessicated or rotted.
                      If the cuttings are not dried out or rotted they are still viable and may be rescued with an old heat treatment that's been discussed in the past...
                      [ATTACH=CONFIG]n75109[/ATTACH]

                      Its used hot tap water 120 - 130 deg F. (allowed to cool down to room temps with the cuttings) to hydrate the cuttings overnight. I've used a similar approach to rooting cuttings by hydrating the moss or coir with hot tap water just before rooting cuttings. The entire book is available here, https://archive.org/details/figitshistorycul00eise
                      Good Luck
                      OOh love the old archival book. And appreciate the wisdom. I have a few that I am deciding whether or not to post a R.I.P. sign over them to get them going one way or the other. Ah the mystery of life. ;-)
                      Newbie to figs. Wishes for your favorite fig. Zone 8, Camp Verde AZ

                      Comment


                      • AscPete
                        AscPete commented
                        Editing a comment
                        For very stubborn cuttings I've done a direct plant (after soaking) in gallon nursery pots, fully buried and placed on a covered porch, sometimes they take root with little or no additional attention.

                      • SarinaP
                        SarinaP commented
                        Editing a comment
                        That sounds like an easy method to try! I've definitely got multiples that will get that treatment now!

                    • #12
                      Originally posted by SmyFigs View Post
                      Sarah, I recently wondered the same thing. I had quite a few cuttings that seemed to do nothing. But they were viable and I could see this except no roots. At least I thought no roots! I took all of them out this past weekend and found that they all had a nice ball of roots but they were not showing on the outside of my cups. These cuttings were some that had been through hell and back. I mean they were in moss first but they didnt do well but I rescued them. anyway, I was happily surprised!
                      Yea Meg for the miracle of life and for you not giving up on them. Happy spring.
                      Newbie to figs. Wishes for your favorite fig. Zone 8, Camp Verde AZ

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                      • #13
                        Woohoo, Jodi!! Yeah!!

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                        • #14
                          Worms seem to know which cuttings are dead. I've had multiple cuttings in a 1 gallon pot and there would be some dead and some alive with leaf buds. The dead cuttings when pulled out would be completely stripped of their bark and the live cuttings were untouched. I wonder if the live plants release a chemical that says the buffet is closed or if worms can just sniff out rotted wood.
                          Ben B.
                          Seattle, WA

                          http://seattlegardenfruit.blogspot.com/

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                          • #15
                            So here is my last stop shop for my unsuccessful cuttings. I've left them alone for over a week and a few are leafing! Hooray!
                            You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
                            Zone 7a in Virginia

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                            • jmaler
                              jmaler commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Sarina, you may find this time of year that rooting in a bucket like in your photo can be very successful. Remember this event for next year. You just may be on to something here.

                            • Harborseal
                              Harborseal commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Yay! Congratulaations!
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