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  • #26
    It doesn't matter which kind of traps you use. There are a few important things that can even your odds.

    1. Follow their tracks so you know exactly the road they take. You can track the poops, debris, damages, which map out their trails. For cautious animals, they follow their own or group scent or even other group's scent to run the same track daily and don't wander off easily.

    Traps that are put far away from their trails are useless. It may look stupid to you to have 10 traps along the trail instead of spreading them out. I tried it both ways. Spreading the traps out randomly don't get the same result as putting them along the trail.

    2. Find their favorite bait. Different animals or even animals at different locations have their favorites. e.g. I didn't know my SoCal rats like roasted peanut over other things until I tried other things. You need something that has a stronger draw than the fruit in your garden. Use something with a strong scent and can be kept fresh for a while under the elements.

    3. Trap them early in the season. Please don't wait till your harvest time. By then, they have a couple of generations behind them. They are at breeding age, more experienced, and eat more.

    4. Use traps that can get them all at a time. I am not saying it works every time like that but if you only put out one snap trap and they have 10 in the family. You are basically teaching them how to avoid or evade the trap next time. I lean toward traps that can take out the whole litter in one or couple shots.

    5. And then, there are rookie mistakes like not securing your bait. Tie it down so there is no way they can get the bait without setting off the trap. Test the trap a few times before setting it out. Secure the traps and cover it with cardboard or some enclosure. I do this for both live and death traps.

    6. Count your results. A litter of rats has 7-10 members. If you got 10, you are good for a little while before the next group moves in. And that means you don't have to refresh the bait or even putting out all the traps.
    Moved from SoCal 10b to N. NJ 7a

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    • #27
      grasshopper . Your point about trapping the rats early in the season makes total sense. There are a number of documentaries about when the bamboo forests flower in Northeast India every 50-60 years, the rats feed on the flowers and multiply like crazy. After the bamboo food supply is gone, the rats invade the rice farms and bring famine to the towns. Keeping the numbers low, like with SARS-CoV-2 is the key.
      Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
      WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
      Better to give than to receive

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      • #28
        I am not allowed to use poison for the same reason!
        Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
        WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
        Better to give than to receive

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        • #29
          I have had zero luck with traps so far. I can watch them on my video cam at night and they pay zero interest to the traps, just jump/go around them. Even the trap I put in my blueberry bush that they seem to love hanging out in. Going to try the SlimJims as bait next and if that doesn't work go for the poison...
          Los Angeles, CA (Zone 10b)

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          • 599gh888
            599gh888 commented
            Editing a comment
            Try bubble gums. Smart n final sale a 3 lbs bags for 7. Dump all of them because you want to get rid of the whole family. You won’t see it die but the numbers will be less and less.

        • #30
          Dumb questions. Do you peel off the wraps? And is this the bubblegum you use?
          Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
          WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
          Better to give than to receive

          Comment


          • 599gh888
            599gh888 commented
            Editing a comment
            No need to peel them. Just those the whole bucket. They will gorge themselves to death. I found one in a daze this morning trying to digest the gum. I had to finish the job

        • #31
          So I tried the quick sand trap last night. I hope I am allowed to show my results this morning.
          Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
          WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
          Better to give than to receive

          Comment


          • Halligan-
            Halligan- commented
            Editing a comment
            Great setup!
            I can’t wait to try it on squirrels

        • #32
          grasshopper, thanks. Two more this morning. The quicksand bucket has worked so far. 3 in two nights!
          Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
          WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
          Better to give than to receive

          Comment


          • #33
            My last photos of dead rats. The quicksand (perlite) with sunflower seeds seems to work. Make sure the water level is low enough to prevent the rodents from reaching the seeds and once inside the bucket, they don’t jump out. Thanks again for the tip.
            Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
            WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
            Better to give than to receive

            Comment


            • #34
              No photos as promised. Quicksand trap still effective this morning!!! Brilliant tip! Thanks again.
              Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
              WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
              Better to give than to receive

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              • #35
                Trying out the quicksand trap with slimjim's as bait. Out last night with no luck... Will try again tonight.
                Los Angeles, CA (Zone 10b)

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                • #36
                  Try sunflower seeds. They float and stay on top of the perlite. Very inexpensive. I basically cover the top of the perlite with a thin layer of seeds. I put a few on the plank leading to the ledge.
                  Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
                  WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
                  Better to give than to receive

                  Comment


                  • #37
                    Don't stop until you get the whole litter. Litter around this time of the year usually have 9-10 members. 2 large and 7-8 smaller. And no to the photos.


                    Moved from SoCal 10b to N. NJ 7a

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                    • #38
                      Yes, no more photos! Did not get one this morning. Between the Ratinator and quicksand traps I got two large ones and 9 slightly smaller but same size in two weeks. I will continue to set them because I know there are more. The sunflower seeds on the plank were eaten. Could have been birds? Hope so. Thanks again for your great post!!!!
                      Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
                      WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
                      Better to give than to receive

                      Comment


                      • fig girl
                        fig girl commented
                        Editing a comment
                        how does your quick sand trap work? What do you use?
                        my rats are so smart I can't use the snap traps because they will just through stuff at them and set them off to steal the bait.

                    • #39
                      Sounds like you caught your first litter of rats. You can check if there is any poop on or around the plank.

                      The rats in my area usually come out in a group in the early evening (6-10pm). Some would run around during the day under shade.

                      Chipmunks and squirrels are active 6-10am. Sunflower seed is also one of their favorites.
                      Moved from SoCal 10b to N. NJ 7a

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                      • #40
                        No poop around the plank and fortunately, I don’t have chipmunks and almost never a squirrel. But many birds that go for sunflower seeds.
                        Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
                        WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
                        Better to give than to receive

                        Comment


                        • #41
                          fig girl . My Quicksand trap is just a 5 gal bucket filled with water 2/3 up with an inch of perlite and a board to its edge. I have the bucket on a cement stairs so the board (plank) is almost flat. I place sunflower seeds on the plank and on top of the perlite. The rats eat the ones on the plank and then jump in to get the ones inside the bucket. BINGO!
                          Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
                          WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
                          Better to give than to receive

                          Comment


                          • #42
                            No luck again last night with the quicksand trap or spring traps. I have resorted to covering the remaining fruit I do have left (that hasn't been eaten by the rats!) in organza bags and that seems to work so far... But still need to catch the rats! As much as I don't really want to us it, poison is going out tonight as well...
                            Los Angeles, CA (Zone 10b)

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                            • #43
                              Did you use sunflower seeds? It is foolproof!
                              Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
                              WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
                              Better to give than to receive

                              Comment


                              • #44
                                I had to use my game camera to catch/see what was getting into my tomatoes. My German Shepherds took care of the culprit getting my figs...believe it or not...it was a raccoon!
                                Attached Files

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                                • #45
                                  Your raccoons look a lot like our squirrels!
                                  Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
                                  WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
                                  Better to give than to receive

                                  Comment


                                  • DrDraconian
                                    DrDraconian commented
                                    Editing a comment
                                    Figs / racoon, tomatoes / squirrel. I had to read twice to catch that there were two different pests discovered.

                                • #46
                                  Raccoons love my Fuyu persimmons. The one squirrel I had feasted on my tomatoes, like yours. Unfortunately for it, it also liked my peanut butter coated almond I placed on my rat spring traps. How do you handle your squirrels?
                                  Peter - San Diego 10a. Santa Rosa 9b, 10b
                                  WL: Any great tasting and prolific fig tree
                                  Better to give than to receive

                                  Comment

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