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  • Spotted Wing Drosphila 2016 Season

    Well, it want be much longer and we will be discussing this horrible insect
    again. This season I will be trying traps that I obtained from ISCA Technologies
    in Riverside California along with Spinosad spray. I made mention of using
    the traps in another post the other day and I was told that was for only
    determining the presence of the fruit fly. Using these traps with the torula yeast
    tablets, sugar water and apple cider vinegar is a means of mass trapping the
    insects.

    You can learn more about the insects and some control methods along with
    purchasing items for this process at http://iscatech.com/

    Here is the instruction sheet for the ball trap and torula yeast http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/028...ap_SWD.pdf?537

    For those who have dealt with the insect good luck this season and keep
    the forum posted of ways you have found to deal with the insect.
    newnandawg 7b Newnan, GA

  • #2
    Everything I have read said traps will not reduce the overall population, but I hope it works! I worry about using them for the same reason Japanese Beetle traps are bad, in that they attract pests from other areas to your yard.

    When do you plan to first spray spinosad? Fig formation or fig swell?
    Youtube: PA Figs eBay: tdepoala
    Wishlist: Galicia Negra, Paritjal Rimada, Black Ischia UCD

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    • #3
      Mike, a tip I read on Spinosad sprays to encourage the adults to eat it is to mix in sugar at 2lbs per 100 gallons of spray. That was the commercial recommendation, hopefully you don't need 100 gallons at a time!
      https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
      SE PA
      Zone 6

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      • #4
        How bad where they last year for you guys? I think this was more my fault for not addressing the issue since my figs took a back seat last year, but I got hardy any figs I would eat for a period of time before the weather got cooler. There would be swarms of them on the trees and most of the figs would just rot.

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        • #5
          They were terrible for me for a period as well. First year I have ever seen them.
          Youtube: PA Figs eBay: tdepoala
          Wishlist: Galicia Negra, Paritjal Rimada, Black Ischia UCD

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          • #6
            Yeah, this was the first year for me too. I never had any issues at my old house two miles away. My one friend who has figs in a more "country" area about 25 minutes away hasn't had any issues.

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            • #7
              It may be a bit ridiculous for some people, however....

              What about building a framework around a fig or several and streaching screen over it.

              Keep the flies out.

              For a walk in type cage, add a man trap to prevent flies from entering with you.
              Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

              “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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              • #8
                Covering with cheap tulle might help keep them out?
                Don - OH Zone 6a Wish list: Zaffiro, Moro de Caneva, Nerucciolo d'Elba, Bordissot Blanca Negra

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                • #9
                  I think it depends what sort of fruiting vegetation is in your vicinity. The year they were the worst for me, my neighbors had chokecherry trees that were loaded with fruit. The chokecherries I believe were a host/breeding ground. The vinegar traps do not stop them, but I feel that every one of the little @@@@@@@s you can take out = less eggs to be laid. They will come with or without the traps.
                  Calvin, Wish list is to finish working on the new house, someday.
                  Bored? Grab a rake, paint roller, or a cordless drill and come over!

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                  • #10
                    How long have they been around?

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                    • #11
                      Well, I saw the first one this morning on a fig leaf. Was going to take a pic but he flew. I realize the traps
                      are not going to solve the problem. However doing
                      nothing isn't either. Between the traps and Spinosad
                      I hope to kill a bunch. That would be more than was
                      killed here last season. They were devistating for a
                      good part of the season. The traps go out tomorrow
                      to verify if they are already here. If the results are positive the spraying starts soon. I already have
                      some pretty large brebas on some potted plants
                      so it's only a matter of time.

                      Kelby, thanks for that info. I plan to mix the sugar
                      with the yeast and vinegar traps as well as the
                      Spinosad spray.
                      Last edited by newnandawg; 03-27-2016, 08:57 PM.
                      newnandawg 7b Newnan, GA

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                      • #12
                        I'll have to keep an eye out. I got my few breba with out any issues and didn't see anything until until the main crop started really coming in. And now that I'm thinking about it I wonder if I know what happened. Usually we go on vacation at at the end of August. I got someone to water my trees and I told them to take anything that ripened, but they don't, they will just let them rot in the tree. When I came home there were a good amount of exploded figs. I wonder if that got the ball rolling.

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                        • #13
                          Is there a predator that can be attracted to your yards?
                          Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                          “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

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                          • #14
                            Don't know of any and I don't know what could
                            possibly handle an infestation like I had last
                            year.
                            newnandawg 7b Newnan, GA

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                            • #15
                              Additional information

                              http://www.fruit.cornell.edu/spotted.../SWDgarden.pdf
                              newnandawg 7b Newnan, GA

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                              • #16
                                I guess they are here all the time, but in smaller numbers. Disturbing Mike saw one so early fearing the milder winter kept population numbers up. I normally get through early season without them on my figs. But get a few days of summer rains the populations seems to explode.
                                Phil North Georgia Zone 7 Looking for: All of them, and on and on,

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                                • #17
                                  Phil, I read in one article that said several days in a row of 50+ temps will bring them out. I have two traps out so we will see.
                                  Last edited by newnandawg; 03-28-2016, 01:14 PM.
                                  newnandawg 7b Newnan, GA

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                                  • #18
                                    Watched Wall-E the other night. Wouldn't it be nice to have 50-60 mosquito-sized robot drones programmed to zap these little buggers....and chase away squirrels, birds, cats, deer, and trespassing neighbors stealing figs?
                                    Bryant...Franklin County, VA...Zone 7a. Wish List: a 32 hour day....more sleep

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                                    • #19
                                      I wonder if a few bat boxes would help control their population?
                                      Youtube: PA Figs eBay: tdepoala
                                      Wishlist: Galicia Negra, Paritjal Rimada, Black Ischia UCD

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                                      • #20
                                        Only on the flies are in flight at dusk and night. The bats on my area are a huge help in keeping mosquitoes in check.
                                        Scott - Colorado Springs, CO - Zone 4/5 (Depending on the year) - Elevation 6266ft

                                        “Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.” – Bill Mollison

                                        Comment


                                        • #21
                                          From http://www.smallfruits.org/Newsletter/Vol16-Issue2.pdf

                                          "Based on research and Extension work at Mississippi State University and by cooperating berry growers like Robert Hayes at Dumas, MS, we know hummingbirds are attracted with feeders to eat populations of the fruit-destructive spotted-wing drosophila (SWD) fruit fly. It makes common sense to plant these attractive, blooming wildflowers and perennial native plants close by our berry fields too! I believe we berry growers could help all our pollinators including our fruit fly-eating hummingbirds by having these good, natural nectar and pollen sources close to our berry fields. Such plantings may eliminate the need of purchasing and frequently filling and having to frequently clean hummingbird feeders in our berry plantings. Also, the more I learn about native plants and the need for planting them to aid pollinators, the less I like all of my lawn grass that takes up so much space that our native plants and pollinators need and could use! "

                                          I have hummingbird feeders so I might as well put one next to my RdB, as it was a SWD magnet last year. It surely can't hurt.
                                          PPP
                                          Eatonton, GA zone 7b/8a

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                                          • #22
                                            I was thinking the same thing about the bats. We have a healthy bat population and pest insects are really kept in check (knock on wood!!).

                                            I'd be curious if there are any hard facts that bats keep SWD in check?

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