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  • Bayer systemic insecticide

    I am thinking about using some of this for the fruit and vegetables in my garden, the bugs are really bad this year in my area because of too much rain and a very mild winter here. I read on the directions that they want you to wait until after the plants have finished blooming? I don't know if many of my plants can wait that long. Has anyone had any personal experience with this product?
    Thanks

  • #2
    The reason they say to wait till blooms are finished is to protect the honeybees, well all bees. Bees are very sensitive to the chemical and it is moved by the plants to the blossoms and the pollen. If you can wait to use it please do.....we owe bees a LOT our existence depends on them so protecting them should be a top priority. I have no issues with imidacloprid and the systemics but they just need to be used in a safe way and with the right timing.
    Cutting sales start Nov 1 at 9PM eastern time as always at willsfigs.com

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    • #3
      Great point Willis, I completely agree.
      Queens NYC - Zone 7b
      (DatesNFigs at the other place.)

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      • #4
        Let me see, you want to put a poison that will go inside a plant, and then eat that plant? I would never even think of using a systemic insecticide on anything I grow for food. Of course, I'm a little silly that way.
        Gary USDA 9A
        Sebastopol, CA

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        • DBJohnson
          DBJohnson commented
          Editing a comment
          Not silly at all! I'm not a fan of eating and drinking insecticide.
          Last edited by DBJohnson; 04-08-2016, 11:15 AM. Reason: I'm also not a fan of typos....

      • #5
        Make sure it is truly labeled for your crops. Most systemic insecticides are not for edibles (though a few are for non-bearing plants).
        https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
        SE PA
        Zone 6

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        • #6
          Humans are not insects. Some people seem to think if it kills the insect if we eat enough of it it will harm us. That the increase of size in humans over insects is why they die, and we do not, it simply for many of these products is not the way it works. Take for example birds, They eat many berries quite happily that if humans ate them we would die. Why? We are sensitive to the compound that is in the fruit and birds are not. Insects eat leaves of toxic plants that if we ate them we would become ill or die. Why? The insects are immune to the toxin and we are not. It works the other way around also. You find a compound that is harmless to mammals but deadly to insects and you have a great SAFE, TARGETED insecticide. We just have to be careful of the insects we do not want to harm. Just because it harms an insect does NOT necessarily mean it will harm a mammal. So unless your mother was human and your father a grasshopper you will probably suffer no harm. All one has to do is, instead of listening to the hype, read the studies and see the massive doses of some of these systemics they feed to mice and rats before harm is noted (if it ever is). You would need to eat handfuls of the product and you would probably choke to death before you would suffer any poisoning. Some of these systemics get a bad rap and people are up in arms about them but it isn't because they are toxic to you, it is because people are trying to save the bees and some people get confused.

          This is from the University of Florida.
          Neonicotinoids are classified by the EPA as both toxicity class II and class III agents and are labeled with the signal word “Warning” or “Caution.” Because the neonicotinoids block a specific neuron pathway that is more abundant in insects than warm-blooded animals, these insecticides are more selectively toxic to insects than mammals.
          The most available toxicity data of the neonicotinoids is with imidacloprid. These data indicate that it is less toxic when absorbed by the skin or when inhaled compared to ingestion. It causes minor eye reddening, but is non-irritating to the skin. Signs of toxicity in rats include lethargy, respiratory disturbances, decreased movement, staggering gait, occasional trembling, and spasm. There are. no accounts of human poisoning, but signs and symptoms of poisoning would be expected to be those similar for rats.
          A chronic toxicity study showed that rats fed up to 1,800 ppm resulted in a No Observable Effect Level (NOEL) of 100 ppm. The EPA categorizes imidacloprid as a “Group E” (no evidence of carcinogenicity). In animals and humans, imidacloprid is quickly and almost completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, and eliminated via urine and feces within 48 hours. Of the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid is the most toxic to birds and fish. Both imidacloprid and thiamethoxam are highly toxic to honeybees.


          Ok, off my soapbox.
          Last edited by WillsC; 04-08-2016, 01:24 PM. Reason: Edited to add passage from UF
          Cutting sales start Nov 1 at 9PM eastern time as always at willsfigs.com

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          • #7
            Originally posted by WillsC View Post
            So unless your mother was human and your father a grasshopper ...
            Cue Monty Python... "You Mother was a human, and your Father was a grasshopper!!!"
            https://www.figbid.com/Listing/Browse?Seller=Kelby
            SE PA
            Zone 6

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            • DBJohnson
              DBJohnson commented
              Editing a comment
              Gadzooks! He's discovered my secret!

            • Needaclone
              Needaclone commented
              Editing a comment
              Hop Away! Hop Away!

          • #8
            You guys are hilarious, Okay I will try to wait until after my plants have bloomed, ( if possible). So I picked up the Bayer fruit/veggie product started reading and the directions are just for ground usage? Well I have a lot of things in pots also, so I called and spoke with one of their help line people who told me the product would burn the roots in potted plants? You would think it would work for both, so was she just reading from a prompted list on a computer screen and didn't find the answer I need/ I am confused about the whole thing. So long story short, can I use this product and what is the correct dosage for potted plants and last but the most important question is will it kill spider mites? Ohh also the active ingredient is .235% Imidacloprid

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