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  • Soaking and the hydration of cuttings

    Cuttings come in all shapes, sizes and quality. The most important aspect of a cutting is for it to root before it dries out or rots, or both.
    Freshly cut dormant cuttings have not desiccated yet and the cells remain turgid. This turgid state allows cells to develop into roots and shoots quickly which increases cutting success.

    The first image shows a viable dormant cutting that is desiccated. I was just delivered in the mail. Look closely at the bark layer and ridges are clearly visible.

    The second image shows the same cutting at the same angle after a 48 hour soak. This cutting is fully turgid and hydrated and can proceed to active root growth quickly.

    If you have difficulty with cuttings and do not re hydrate your cuttings prior to sticking in a pot it's a very easy upgrade.





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    Ian

    Really happy with what I have.

  • #2
    Can you give us pics of the rooted cutting?
    Jerry, Canyon Lake TX 8b

    Comment


    • The Figster
      The Figster commented
      Editing a comment
      I will do. The cuttings in the OP were stuck yesterday.

  • #3
    I always soak mine for 24-72 hours. It seems to help. Kelby recently sent me some cuttings that came from a mutual friend that had a long trip and I soaked them and in 3 days they actually had roots which is a new one for me. About 3 days is the max to soak unless you change the water out.
    Cutting sales have ended for the season. Plant sales will start March 1 at 8 eastern time. If it is still too cold in your area I can hold your plants till a date of your choosing.

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    • figs and tropicals
      figs and tropicals commented
      Editing a comment
      hi WillsC when "soaking" in mentioned, do you submerge the entire cutting, or just the rooting end a few inches up? I've always wondered when people say that, what exactly do they mean?

  • #4
    Great information... thank you for sharing...
    My wish list is what ever come from my dear friend is the most special fig no matter what the vatiety is. I wish my dear friend to stay well always and always be happy. Jonathan

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    • #5
      Bringing this thread back to life, i imagine we should hydrate the whole cutting in water, especially since you want to hydrate all of it.

      Does anyone else use this technique for shipped cuttings?

      The Figster how did that cutting do? Any noticeable enhancement?
      Najam from Sugar Land, Texas, Zone 9a

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      • #6
        I usually soak for at least a few hours and up to a couple of days, three at the most. I also tell people that are shipping to soak for a couple of hours if I know I won't be able to tend to the cuttings as soon as they arrive.
        Seems the extra water plumps them up and probably increases chances of survival.
        Monterrey, MX Zone 10b // San Antonio,TX Zone 9a

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        • #7
          Even though the whole cutting is submerged should the bottom end be trimmed a little to increase water uptake or is that unnecessary? Also, should the diluted bleach solution be used after the rehydration process?
          Last edited by Suemc; 11-19-2019, 06:00 AM.
          Central IL Z6a
          WL: Roots on the nice cutting I have!

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          • #8
            I think the top can be sticking out, I don't know if submerging the whole cutting is a good idea. I'm assuming the cutting will hydrate by soaking the water up through the cutting. At least that's how I understand it, could be wrong as I've only rooted one cutting in water using this method...it worked though, it's a 4ft tall Violet Sepor now.

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            • #9
              Soaking is an easy enough thing to do. Does anyone see a reason for not soaking the cutting? I would disinfect it after soaking.
              Worcester, Massachusetts, Zone 6a - In containers 1 gal - 15 gal. Wish list: Dore' de Porquerolles

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              • #10
                I timely look at an old thread.

                This particular cutting is Ponte tresa and back in April of 2016, when this thread was posted, it was hot property.

                I bought it from Harveyc and the USPS, who I find very reliable, took 8 days to deliver it!

                Firstly, I don’t soak all my cutting for 2 days. If it dry and wrinkly it will respond as in the images above. On recently traded cuttings I cut 1/8” to expose open cells and then immediately into warm water for 30 minutes.

                If your cuttings are properly stored and of good size and quality prolonged soaking is not required.

                The cutting grew very well, as did other cuttings that came from it.

                I would place ‘rehydration’ as step 2 in the hole successful cutting growing dance. By itself not much will happen. As part of the bigger plan it’s a valuable tool.


                Ian

                Really happy with what I have.

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                • #11
                  I have recently made this upgrade in my rooting life. It absolutely helps. I have been submerging the whole cutting in warm to somewhat hot water in a bread loaf pan and changing the water daily. A fresh cut at the bottom and top allow it to rehydrate better, but maybe it's not absolutely necessary. I've been letting it soak for 3 days minimum. When it rehydrates, the pith starts to become clear, this is a great indicator of how hydrated the cutting is as well as looking at the desiccation of the bark. These two cuttings are in various stages of rehydration right now. The one on the left is just starting to become clear in the very middle. The one on the right is almost fully clear. I've been deeming it "ready" after the pith is fully clear.
                  Attached Files
                  -Luke S. at Keesler AFB, 9a
                  -SAH Dad, gardener, fan of comedy, philosophy, and the deep dive on YouTube
                  -W/L: NSdC, Cosme Manyo, Fracazzano Multicolore, Campy

                  Comment


                  • Najamm
                    Najamm commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Have you noticed better rooting success when the cutting is well hydrated this way?

                  • Lucrative
                    Lucrative commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I believe so. This coupled with a new rooting method I've been using recently has been highly successful so far. I want a few more results across a few more varieties for proof of the method. I'm going to make a detailed post soon.

                • #12
                  Thank you for sharing the 8nformation on soaking in detail. It's very helpful for us new figgers.
                  SE gulf coast (zone: 9B). WL: Azores Dark, CdD Noir, Golden Rainbow, Hative d’Argenteuil, Iranian candy, Fig Preto, LSU Scott Black, Socoro Black, Sweet George

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                  • #13
                    This question is for the members that wrap their cuttings in Parafilm. Do you allow any drying time at all before wrapping the cutting?
                    I like to soak my cuttings but always worry that
                    they May have too much moisture under the Parafilm which will promote rot.
                    Tim-Zone 8a/Northport, Alabama
                    WL- Calderona, Black Tuscan, Genovese Nero AF or
                    any good dark figs.

                    Comment


                    • BC BYRON
                      BC BYRON commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yes let them air dry spaced out before wrapping

                    • Lucrative
                      Lucrative commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yes, you absolutely must let the area that you're going to wrap dry first. You can leave the cuttings in a cup with just an inch of water at the bottom. That would allow the top to dry while still keeping the cutting hydrated if you can't get right to it.

                  • #14
                    Excellent thread, especially for us newbies. I have tried rooting some of my cuttings in water(just bottoms) and root initials have started to show.
                    but given the results I have seen here I might try soaking the entire cutting before I starting any rooting method.
                    thanks for this valuable info.
                    Newbie, Central Jersey, looking forward to first crop of figshttps://www.ourfigs.com/core/images/smilies/cool.png.
                    WL: CLBC, CC, BM KK.

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                    • #15
                      Soaking helps... I’ve wrapped cuttings in Parafilm without soaking and proceeded directly to cups, many times the parafilm will split as the cutting becomes hydrated from the rooting medium moisture. So I try to soak before the parafilm now.
                      Zone 8b. West Central Louisiana

                      Comment


                      • Najamm
                        Najamm commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Ahh, that makes sense. i wondered why the parafilm splits.

                    • #16
                      I've found soaking to be especially helpful for partially lignified green cuttings. I would soak them for weeks in a sunny window, frequently replacing the water. It allowed for the cuttings to harden up and root nodes to develop, then I direct pot them. Prior experience with direct potting of partially lignified cuttings resulted in high chance of rot to the cutting.

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