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  • Pictures of Figs in your landscape

    This is my first year of propagating figs and I was wondering if anyone would like to share pictures of how they've incorporated their fig trees in their yard or landscape. My original tree is in its own little island on the side yard, but all my "new babies" will be going in the back yard and some espaliered along the side of the house or the patio. I'm not entirely sure where I'll be putting everything and would love to see how others arrange their plants.

    Thank you!
    Zone 7a in Virginia

  • #2
    Tis is one😁

    Chi-Talia Blanco
    Attached Files
    Zone 5 Chicago IL Wish list:
    1) Rest peacfully Amico Bello Buddy 👼🏼.
    2) This weeks ebay auctions.

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    • SarinaP
      SarinaP commented
      Editing a comment
      Beautiful! I love that latticework too! I like how you have some of the smaller ones nearby.

    • Taverna78
      Taverna78 commented
      Editing a comment
      Oh they all over now. Almost time to get orchard going

  • #3
    Here are some in my back yard.
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    Gary USDA 9A
    Sebastopol, CA

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    • SarinaP
      SarinaP commented
      Editing a comment
      Beautiful setup you have there-- I love your roses and vines too--it all looks amazing!

  • #4
    First picture: This is my planting of my larger fig trees next to the street. The county insists we maintain this space and this is how I maintain it. I hope to have shade for the street cars someday. I found out where my utilities lines were and left some space around them but roots might be a problem in the future.

    Second picture: I have been following the “four in a box”, “three in a hole” planting pattern for my fruit trees for around twenty-five years now. Plums, pluots, apricots, peaches, nectarines, apples all work well with the right rootstock and summer pruning. I have a double size yard, but space is still a challenge. Here you can see four “three in a hole” plantings for fig trees in a triangle with two trees north/one south. I plant to prune them to a size where the figs will be easy to pick. Who needs grass anyway? The RdB in the bottom left is loaded with little figs already.

    Third picture: What didn’t work. (Hope this is helpful too.)
    I don’t think I would ever attempt a fig espalier. Here is an espalier I tried with apple trees, green mulched with Russian Comfrey. The apple trees where miserable being confined to an espalier and really needed more green bulk to withstand the summer burning sun and heat. I gave up on the espalier and let them bush out. They did much better this way but still don’t like our warm winters. You can see a sapote tree behind them. I did a four box with three citrus and a sapote. The sapote won. Bad idea! But I like the sapote better than the citrus, so they all stay.

    Fourth Picture: Here is an apple hedge I started on a south facing wall in the back yard. The apple trees hate the wall heat, refuse to grow, and are being replaced with fig trees.

    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 4 photos.
    Last edited by Altadena Mara; 04-21-2016, 10:12 AM.
    Mara, Southern California,
    Climate Zone: 1990=9b 2012= 10a 2020=?

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    • SarinaP
      SarinaP commented
      Editing a comment
      Great information! I think I may heed your advice and only try to espalier a few this first year. For me, it's more for winter protection for the hardier varieties. Thank you for sharing!

  • #5
    so nice you guys very very pretty

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