X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Best size container?

    Hi all, this is my first winter for rooting cuttings and it looks like come spring I'll have a lot to pot up. My question what would be the recommended size pot for container growing. I know the larger the better, but come next winter, storage space will be an issue. Since I am at a point of purchasing containers, I was wondering which size would be most productive and still be easily stored.
    Dave- Waterford, Ct. Zone 6a

  • #2
    Ive been able to get good production from 5 gallon buckets. It requires more root pruning but keeps the trees small and productive.
    If the containers are to be placed on the ground they can be allowed to send roots into the soil and if the drainage holes are only on the side of the container it will be easier to cut the escaping roots and store them in winter.

    Also, since you have to "up pot" the trees anyway this is a good size for evaluation of the particular cultivar, as to taste and suitability for your location.
    Last edited by AscPete; 02-18-2015, 09:45 AM.
    Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

    Comment


    • #3
      I am in the process of building about 35 5gal SIPs for use as permenant pots, since I have to be able to move them up and down stairs for winter storage. I understand I will have to prune the tree regularly and prune the roots at least every other year. I understand this will not be as productive as larger pots, but it is what I will have to deal with until I get a heated greenhouse. These will be easier to do the fig shuffle with as opposed to really big pots. I will let you know in a couple years how this works out
      Ed
      SW PA zone 6a

      Comment


      • #4
        The 5 gallon SIPs have worked very well for me.
        The fig shuffle and root pruning are pretty easy at this size.
        But once a variety has proven its worth , it is hard to resist moving it up to 25 gallon SIP.
        I have a few in about 10 gallon SIPs and I really like that size. Still easy to shuffle and root prune , but substantially better production for me
        than my 5 gallon SIPs.
        I just can't find any more decent pots in that 10 gallon size that I can use to make SIPs .
        Kerry - NH zone 5
        Wish list - Angelito ,Thermalito , Exquisito , Campaniere, Teramo .

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks everyone, is there a link as to how to build a SIP?
          Dave- Waterford, Ct. Zone 6a

          Comment


        • #6
          I agree on the 5 gallon buckets. The SIPs did really good for me last year. This video gives you a general idea on how to construct it, but I'd suggest watching a few more videos for a more general idea on how they work.
           
          Frank ~ zone 7a VA

          Comment


          • #7
            Is there any drawback or downside to put a 1 qt well rooted cutting in a 5 gallon bucket? I've always done this gradually over a couple years. The first year to a 2-3 gallon pot and then to a 5 gallon pot.
            Kevin (Eastern MA - Zone 5b/6a)

            Comment


            • #8

              Thanks everyone some great input. Any comments on Kevin's question, is it best to wait on the 5 Gal SIPs and just use the 2-3 gal pots at first?
              Dave- Waterford, Ct. Zone 6a

              Comment


              • #9
                I usually move my well rooted cuttings from a 4" square container directly into a 5 gallon SIP.
                Never had a problem with that move.
                Kerry - NH zone 5
                Wish list - Angelito ,Thermalito , Exquisito , Campaniere, Teramo .

                Comment


                • #10
                  I think potting up "should" go in incremental steps due to keeping the moisture level even. Top would dry out long before the bottom. Having said that, ive done it plenty of times where i put a young tree into it's final larger pot. When i stick a dowel to check moisture, the bottom would always be wet still.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    There is no downside if you are careful and don't "overwater" or keep the mix too wet. That is one of the main reasons for the steps in up potting, keeping the volume of potting mix small so that the roots don't drown in excess moisture. Often the roots of young cuttings are not hardened enough for transplant to larger and possible denser, wet and less aerated mixes. IMO and at my location it takes ~ 3 months before the cutting is sufficiently callused and hardened...

                    My usual sequence is Quart - 1 Gallon - 5 Gallon. The quart and 1 gallon are up potted when the container is full of roots (can be removed from the container as a root ball) but well before its root bound. Good Luck
                    Pete R - Hudson Valley, NY - zone 5b

                    Comment


                    • fitzski
                      fitzski commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Pete,

                      Sorry for another newbie question, do you use the same potting mix in the 1 gallon and 5 gallon containers?

                      Also, did you mean that it takes 3 months to go from cutting to 5 gallon or cutting to first transplant?

                      Thanks for the information. I think i'm going to try a few SIPS this year.

                    • AscPete
                      AscPete commented
                      Editing a comment
                      The 1 gallon and 5 gallon containers are usually the normal 5-1-1-1 mix.
                      The 1 - 2 quart containers are in a cutting mix that is sifted through a window screen to remove fines.
                      At least 3 months from cuttings to 5 gallon.
                      I recommend SIPS, but make certain that the roots are sufficiently hardened before planting in a 5 gallon SIP.

                  • #12
                    I went with 7 gal pots (about 6 gal real capacity) because a local nursery had hundreds they were giving away. I took them all. There were also a lot of 10 - 30 gal pots so the best of the 7 gals and certain famous ones go to 10 - 15 gal pots and the best of those will go to 20 - 30 gal. I also bury as many nodes under the soil surface as I can. That way a plant can come back from a rogue cold snap. Check out landscapers and nurseries for used pots and take what you can get that's at least 5 gal. Having various sizes and shapes is perfectly fine..
                    Last edited by Harborseal; 02-18-2015, 01:45 PM.
                    Bob C. KC, MO Zone 6a. Wanted: Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      I have moved 16oz clear cup cuttings directly to 5 gallon SIPs without any issues.
                      Frank ~ zone 7a VA

                      Comment


                      • AscPete
                        AscPete commented
                        Editing a comment
                        How much time were the cuttings in those 16oz cup?

                      • F. Bennett
                        F. Bennett commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Pete,

                        The cups were nearly root bound. When extracting the plant from the cup, the media would stay intact because of all the roots.

                      • AscPete
                        AscPete commented
                        Editing a comment
                        The reason for the questions was to see if the roots were hardened and the cutting bottom was callused. I've done the 16oz "plugs" to 5 gallon containers also, but they were in the cups for a few months and almost root bound. Its a bit safer to go to a 1 gallon transition.

                    • #14
                      Thanks everyone, great information. As a newbe, I think I am going to take the safe route and go with the 2-3 gal pots this year, followed by the 5 gal SIPs next year. That will give me smaller pots for next winters rootings and plenty of time to make the needed 5 gal SIPs. I like Kerry's choice of a 10 gal SIP, I now have a year to find them.
                      Last edited by DaveL; 02-18-2015, 03:52 PM.
                      Dave- Waterford, Ct. Zone 6a

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X